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The role of international public goods in tax cooperation

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  • Kammas, Pantelis
  • Philippopoulos, Apostolis

Abstract

We provide a quantitative assessment of the welfare cost of tax competition or, equivalently, the welfare benefit of international tax policy cooperation. We use a simple multi-country general equilibrium model of a world economy, in which there are two types of cross-country spillovers: the first one is generated by international capital mobility and the second by the presence of an international public good. In the absence of international public goods, although welfare in the non-cooperative case is typically lower than in the cooperative case, the welfare difference is negligible quantitatively. Things change drastically, both quantitatively and qualitatively, once we introduce international public goods. Now, there can be big benefits from cooperation and welfare effects cease to be monotonic.

Suggested Citation

  • Kammas, Pantelis & Philippopoulos, Apostolis, 2009. "The role of international public goods in tax cooperation," MPRA Paper 15844, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:15844
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Persson, Torsten & Tabellini, Guido, 1995. "Double-edged incentives: Institutions and policy coordination," Handbook of International Economics,in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 38, pages 1973-2030 Elsevier.
    2. Guido Tabellini, 2003. "Principles of Policymaking in the European Union: An Economic Perspective," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 49(1), pages 75-102.
    3. Russell Cooper & Andrew John, 1988. "Coordinating Coordination Failures in Keynesian Models," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(3), pages 441-463.
    4. Kjetil Bjorvatn & Guttorm Schjelderup, 2002. "Tax Competition and International Public Goods," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 9(2), pages 111-120, March.
    5. Devereux, Michael P. & Lockwood, Ben & Redoano, Michela, 2008. "Do countries compete over corporate tax rates?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1210-1235, June.
    6. Alesina, Alberto & Wacziarg, Romain, 1999. "Is Europe going too far?," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 1-42, December.
    7. Mendoza, Enrique G. & Tesar, Linda L., 2005. "Why hasn't tax competition triggered a race to the bottom? Some quantitative lessons from the EU," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 163-204, January.
    8. Sorensen, Peter Birch, 2004. "International tax coordination: regionalism versus globalism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(6), pages 1187-1214, June.
    9. George Economides & Apostolis Philippopoulos, 2003. "Are Nash Tax Rates too Low or Too High? The Role of Endogenous Growth in Models with Public Goods," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 6(1), pages 37-53, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Capital mobility; Tax competition; Public goods; Welfare;

    JEL classification:

    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • H2 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue

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