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Why effects of social capital on health status differ between genders: considering the labor market condition

  • Yamamura, Eiji

This paper explores how social capital is related with self-rated health status in Japan and how this relationship is affected by gender, using data for 3075 adult participants in the 2000 Social Policy and Social Consciousness (SPSC) survey. Controlling for endogenous bias, unobserved city size- and area-specific fixed effects, I find that social capital has a significant positive influence on health status for females but not for males. If samples are limited to persons with a job, social capital effects drastically decrease and the difference between genders diminishes. This empirical study provides evidence that people without a job can afford to allocate time to accumulate social capital and thereby improve their health status.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/14985/1/MPRA_paper_14985.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 14985.

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Date of creation: 02 May 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:14985
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  1. yamamura, eiji, 2007. "The effects of the social norm on cigarette consumption: evidence from Japan using panel data," MPRA Paper 10176, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. DiPasquale, Denise & Glaeser, Edward L., 1999. "Incentives and Social Capital: Are Homeowners Better Citizens?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 354-384, March.
  3. Costa-Font, Joan & Mladovsky, Philipa, 2008. "Social capital and the social formation of health-related preferences and behaviours," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(04), pages 413-427, October.
  4. Eiji Yamamura, 2010. "The different impacts of socio-economic factors on suicide between males and females," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(10), pages 1009-1012.
  5. Hilber, Christian A. L., 2007. "New Housing Supply and the Dilution of Social Capital," MPRA Paper 11620, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Nov 2008.
  6. Charles, Kerwin Kofi & DeCicca, Philip, 2008. "Local labor market fluctuations and health: Is there a connection and for whom?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1532-1550, December.
  7. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
  8. Iversen, Tor, 2009. "An exploratory study of associations between social capital and selfassessed health in Norway," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2007:9, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
  9. Laporte, Audrey & Nauenberg, Eric & Shen, Leilei, 2008. "Aging, social capital, and health care utilization in Canada," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(04), pages 393-411, October.
  10. Islam, M. Kamrul & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Gullberg, Bo & Lindström, Martin & Merlo, Juan, 2008. "Social capital externalities and mortality in Sweden," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 19-42, March.
  11. Folland, Sherman, 2008. "An economic model of social capital and health," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(04), pages 333-348, October.
  12. Islam, M. Kamrul & Merlo, Juan & Kawachi, Ichiro & Lindstr m, Martin & Burstr m, Kristina & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 2006. "Does it really matter where you live? A panel data multilevel analysis of Swedish municipality-level social capital on individual health-related quality of life," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(03), pages 209-235, July.
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