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The Dutch Labour Market: Preparing for the Future

Author

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  • Mathijs Gerritsen

    (Ministry of Economic Affairs, Netherlands)

  • Jens Høj

    (OECD)

Abstract

The well performing labour market has delivered low unemployment and relatively stable wage developments. However, it is divided into a small flexible segment and a large more rigid segment, where the adjustment burden of external shocks falls disproportionally on the first group. At the same time, labour utilisation is relatively low, despite a relatively high overall participation rate, due to a high frequency of part-time employment, a low effective retirement age and a high use of disability benefits. Looking ahead, it is unlikely that the organisation of the labour market will allow the economy to continue reaping fully the benefits of globalisation. That would require a labour market that facilitates the allocation of increasingly scarce labour resources to their best use and mobilises underutilised labour resources to counter the ageing related contraction of the labour force.). This Working Paper relates to the 2012 OECD Economic Survey of the Netherlands (www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/netherlands Le marché du travail néerlandais : Préparer l'avenir Le bon fonctionnement du marché du travail a permis de maintenir un faible niveau de chômage et des évolutions salariales relativement stables. Cependant, ce marché est divisé en un grand segment assez rigide et un petit segment flexible, sur lequel pèse de façon disproportionnée la charge de l'ajustement en cas de chocs extérieurs. En outre, l'utilisation de la main-d'oeuvre est faible, malgré un taux d'activité global relativement élevé, en raison de la grande fréquence de l'emploi à temps partiel, d'un faible âge effectif de départ à la retraite et d'un recours important aux prestations d'invalidité. À terme, il est peu probable que l'organisation du marché du travail permettra à l'économie de continuer à tirer pleinement parti de la mondialisation. Il faudrait pour cela un marché du travail qui facilite la réallocation des ressources de main-d'oeuvre de plus en plus rares vers leur meilleure utilisation et mobilise les ressources de main-d'oeuvre sous-utilisées pour contrer la contraction de la population active liée au vieillissement. Ce document de travail se rapporte à l'Étude économique des Pays-Bas de 2012 (www.oecd.org/eco/etudes/Pays-Bas).

Suggested Citation

  • Mathijs Gerritsen & Jens Høj, 2013. "The Dutch Labour Market: Preparing for the Future," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1012, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:1012-en
    DOI: 10.1787/5k4dlff4wcwl-en
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pablo de Pedraza & Martin Guzi & Kea Tijdens, 2020. "Life Satisfaction of Employees, Labour Market Tightness and Matching Efficiency," MUNI ECON Working Papers 2020-02, Masaryk University.
    2. Ulrike Famira-Mühlberger & Ulrike Huemer & Christine Mayrhuber, 2015. "Die Beschäftigungsquote Älterer im europäischen Vergleich," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 58532.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    allocation of the labour supply; formation des salaires; globalisation; indemnités de départ; labour market; labour market policies; marché du travail; mondialisation; politique du marché du travail; répartition de l'offre de travail; severance pay; wage formation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

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