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Diversity in Segmention. Patterns of Immigrant Competition in US Labor Markets

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  • Noe Wiener

    () (Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

Abstract

Competition between immigrant and native workers takes place in labor markets that are segmented along various, often unobservable dimensions. It is desirable to measure the extent to which native workers are effectively shielded from competition by immigrant workers by virtue of such patterns of segmentation. This paper proposes measures of group differences in labor market segmentation on the basis of incomplete data, such as can be obtained from the US Census. These measures are derived from a general class of models of labor competition in the Smithian tradition. The observed wage distributions of native and foreign-born workers in the United States (at the national and metropolitan level) can be approximated remarkably well with this class of model, suggesting that a parsimonious account of wage inequality is feasible.

Suggested Citation

  • Noe Wiener, 2019. "Diversity in Segmention. Patterns of Immigrant Competition in US Labor Markets," Working Papers 1901, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:new:wpaper:1901
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    File URL: http://www.economicpolicyresearch.org/econ/2019/NSSR_WP_012019.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2019
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Kennan & James R. Walker, 2011. "The Effect of Expected Income on Individual Migration Decisions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(1), pages 211-251, January.
    2. Scharfenaker, Ellis & dos Santos, Paulo L., 2015. "The distribution and regulation of Tobin’s q," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 191-194.
    3. Ellis Scharfenaker & Gregor Semieniuk, 2017. "A Statistical Equilibrium Approach to the Distribution of Profit Rates," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(3), pages 465-499, July.
    4. Markus P. A. Schneider, 2013. "Evidence for Multiple Labor Market Segments: An Entropic Analysis of US Earned Income, 1996-2007," Journal of Income Distribution, Ad libros publications inc., vol. 22(2), pages 60-98, June.
    5. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
    6. Basso, Gaetano & Peri, Giovanni, 2015. "The Association between Immigration and Labor Market Outcomes in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 9436, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Keane, Michael P. & Todd, Petra E. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 2011. "The Structural Estimation of Behavioral Models: Discrete Choice Dynamic Programming Methods and Applications," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 4, pages 331-461, Elsevier.
    8. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ellis Scharfenaker, 2019. "Implications of Quantal Response Statistical Equilibrium," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2019_07, University of Utah, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; labor market competition; segmented labor markets; wage inequality; statistical equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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