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Distortionary Taxation, Excessive Price Sensitivity, and Japanese Land Prices

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Listed:
  • Kiyohiko G. Nishimura
  • Fukujyu Yamazaki
  • Takako Idee
  • Toshiaki Watanabe

Abstract

Japan has experienced turbulent behavior of land prices after World War II, especially after 1985. This paper first examines the explanatory power of a simple present-value model and shows its limitation. We then investigate two additional (not mutually exclusive) factors affecting the Japanese land price behavior: distortionary inheritance and capital-gains taxation, and excessive price sensitivity due to the non-Walrasian structure of the land market. Empirical results show that distortionary taxation is a major culprit of high residential land price, and that the non-Walrasian price behavior magnifies the effect of underlying change in the market fundamentals.

Suggested Citation

  • Kiyohiko G. Nishimura & Fukujyu Yamazaki & Takako Idee & Toshiaki Watanabe, 1999. "Distortionary Taxation, Excessive Price Sensitivity, and Japanese Land Prices," NBER Working Papers 7254, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7254
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kiyohiko G. Nishimura, 1999. "Expectations Heterogeneity and Excessive Price Sensitivity in the Land Market," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 50(1), pages 26-43, March.
    2. Ng, Victor & Engle, Robert F. & Rothschild, Michael, 1992. "A multi-dynamic-factor model for stock returns," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1-2), pages 245-266.
    3. Michael M. Hutchison, 1994. "Asset Price Fluctuations in Japan: What Role for Monetary Policy?," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 12(2), pages 61-83, December.
    4. Takatoshi Ito, 1994. "Public Policy and Housing in Japan," NBER Chapters,in: Housing Markets in the United States and Japan, pages 215-238 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Engle, Robert F. & Ng, Victor K. & Rothschild, Michael, 1990. "Asset pricing with a factor-arch covariance structure : Empirical estimates for treasury bills," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-2), pages 213-237.
    6. Douglas Stone & William T. Ziemba, 1993. "Land and Stock Prices in Japan," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 149-165, Summer.
    7. Neil Shephard, 2005. "Stochastic Volatility," Economics Papers 2005-W17, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    8. Kanemoto, Yoshitsugu, 1997. "The housing question in Japan," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 613-641, November.
    9. Fujita, Masahisa & Kashiwadani, Masuo, 1989. "Testing the efficiency of urban spatial growth: A case study of Tokyo," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 156-192, March.
    10. Takatoshi Ito & Tokuo Iwaisako, 1996. "Explaining Asset Bubbles in Japan," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 14(1), pages 143-193, July.
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    12. Carlson, John A & Parkin, J Michael, 1975. "Inflation Expectations," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 42(166), pages 123-138, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mitchell, Olivia S. & Piggott, John, 2004. "Unlocking housing equity in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 466-505, December.
    2. Alpanda, Sami, 2007. "The Boom-Bust Cycle in Japanese Asset Prices," MPRA Paper 5895, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Sami Alpanda, 2012. "Taxation, collateral use of land, and Japanese asset prices," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 819-850, October.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G19 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Other

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