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Fiscal Stance and the Real Exchange: Some Empirical Estimates

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  • Richard Clarida
  • Joe Prendergast

Abstract

This paper presents some empirical results on the dynamic relationship between fiscal policy and the real exchange rate in the G3 countries since advent of floating exchange rates. This subject is of some interest given the recent shift to fiscal surpluses in the US, the annual announcement of yet another fiscal stimulus package in Japan, and Maastricht limits on fiscal deficits in Germany and the rest of Euroland. To the extent that the foreign exchange market anticipates that fiscal contractions will follow expansions,' as would be required by the government's intertemporal budget constraint when holding constant the present value of tax collections, it is possible that the exchange rate response to any contemporaneous index of fiscal stance will depend upon exactly what stage the government's fiscal cycle' is (thought to be) in. We find a similarity across the G3 countries in their estimated dynamic responses to a fiscal shock. At first, and for several years thereafter, the real exchange rate appreciates in response to an expansionary fiscal shock. However, eventually, the process is reversed; the real exchange rate overshoots and actually depreciates relative to its initial prevailing before the fiscal shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Clarida & Joe Prendergast, 1999. "Fiscal Stance and the Real Exchange: Some Empirical Estimates," NBER Working Papers 7077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7077
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    1. Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles, 1996. "The Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks: Evidence from the Flow of Funds," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 16-34, February.
    2. Clarida, Richard & Gali, Jordi, 1994. "Sources of real exchange-rate fluctuations: How important are nominal shocks?," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 1-56, December.
    3. Kenneth A. Froot & Kenneth Rogoff, 1991. "The EMS, the EMU, and the Transition to a Common Currency," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1991, Volume 6, pages 269-328 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Blanchard, Olivier J, 1985. "Debt, Deficits, and Finite Horizons," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(2), pages 223-247, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jooste, Charl & Liu, Guangling (Dave) & Naraidoo, Ruthira, 2013. "Analysing the effects of fiscal policy shocks in the South African economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 215-224.
    2. Baldi, Guido, 2013. "How do Different Government Spending Categories Impact on Private Consumption and the Real Exchange Rate?," MPRA Paper 48600, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Faik Koray & W. Douglas McMillin, 2006. "Fiscal Shocks, the Trade Balance, and the Exchange Rate," Departmental Working Papers 2006-02, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    4. Giancarlo Corsetti & Gernot J. Müller, 2006. "Twin deficits: squaring theory, evidence and common sense," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 21(48), pages 597-638, October.
    5. Roel Beetsma & Massimo Giuliodori & Franc Klaassen, 2006. "Trade spill-overs of fiscal policy in the European Union: a panel analysis," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 21(48), pages 639-687, October.
    6. Kim, Soyoung & Roubini, Nouriel, 2008. "Twin deficit or twin divergence? Fiscal policy, current account, and real exchange rate in the U.S," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 362-383, March.
    7. Mylonidis, Nikolaos & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2011. "The real uncovered interest parity: The case of Canada and the USA," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 255-267, March.
    8. Torben Andersen & Julia Chiriaeva, 2007. "Exchange Rate Pegs, Fiscal Policy and Credibility," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 53-76, February.
    9. Anthony Birchwood & Rudolph Matthias, 2007. "Structural factors associated with primary fiscal balances in developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(10), pages 1235-1243.
    10. Rafiq, Sohrab, 2010. "Fiscal stance, the current account and the real exchange rate: Some empirical estimates from a time-varying framework," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 276-290, November.

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