IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/4919.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A Model of Fiat Money and Barter

Author

Listed:
  • Fumio Hayashi
  • Akihiko Matsui

Abstract

We present an infinite horizon model with capital in which fiat money and barter are two competing means of payment. Fiat money has value because barter is limited by the extent of a double coincidence of wants. The pattern of exchange generally involves both money and barter. We find that the Chicago rule is sufficient for Pareto efficiency, while nominal interest smoothing is necessary. For a specific utility function we provide a complete characterization of the patterns of exchange and calculate the range of inflation rates over which a stationary monetary equilibrium exists.

Suggested Citation

  • Fumio Hayashi & Akihiko Matsui, 1994. "A Model of Fiat Money and Barter," NBER Working Papers 4919, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4919
    Note: ME
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w4919.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Engineer, Merwan & Bernhardt, Dan, 1991. "Money, Barter, and the Optimality of Legal Restrictions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 743-773, August.
    2. Jean-Michel Grandmont & Yves Younes, 1973. "On the Efficiency of a Monetary Equilibrium," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 149-165.
    3. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Wright, Randall, 1991. "A contribution to the pure theory of money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 215-235, April.
    4. Shapley, Lloyd S. & Shubik, Martin, 1969. "On market games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 9-25, June.
    5. Jean-Michel Grandmont & Yves Younes, 1972. "On the Role of Money and the Existence of a Monetary Equilibrium," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 39(3), pages 355-372.
    6. Chatterjee, S. & Corbae, D., 1991. "Endogenous Market Participation and General Equilibrium Value of Money," Working Papers 91-08, University of Iowa, Department of Economics.
    7. Oh, Seonghwan, 1989. "A theory of a generally acceptable medium of exchange and barter," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 101-119, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:5:y:2005:i:3:p:1-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sophie Brana & Mathilde Maurel, 1999. "Barter in Russia: Liquidity Shortage versus Lack of Restructuring," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 271, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Edward J. Green, 2002. "Payment Arrangements and Inflation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 51-57, May.
    4. Krishna, R. Vijay, 2003. "Non-robustness of the Cash-in-Advance Equilibrium in the Trading-Post Model," Working Papers 9-03-2, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Economics.
    5. Samuel E. Vazquez, 2009. "Scale Invariance, Bounded Rationality and Non-Equilibrium Economics," Papers 0902.3840, arXiv.org.
    6. Matsui, Akihiko, 1998. "Strong Currency and Weak Currency," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 305-333, December.
    7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:18:y:2002:i:1:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Randall Wright, 2005. "Introduction To "Models Of Monetary Economies Ii: The Next Generation"," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(2), pages 305-316, May.
    9. R. Vijay Krishna, 2004. "Non-robustness of the Cash-in-advance Equilibrium in the Trading Post Model," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000000104, UCLA Department of Economics.
    10. Deck, Cary A. & McCabe, Kevin A. & Porter, David P., 2006. "Why stable fiat money hyperinflates: Results from an experimental economy," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 471-486, November.
    11. Marvasti, A. & Smyth, David J., 1999. "The effect of barter on the demand for money: an empirical analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 73-80, July.
    12. George Selgin, 2003. "Adaptive Learning and the Transition to Fiat Money," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(484), pages 147-165, January.
    13. Araujo, Luis & Camargo, Braz & Minetti, Raoul & Puzzello, Daniela, 2012. "The essentiality of money in environments with centralized trade," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(7), pages 612-621.
    14. Jean-Paul Chavas & Daniel W. Bromley, 2008. "On the Origins and Evolving Role of Money," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 164(4), pages 624-651, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D51 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Exchange and Production Economies
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4919. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: () or (Joanne Lustig). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.