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Risk of Life Insurers: Recent Trends and Transmission Mechanisms

Listed author(s):
  • Ralph S.J. Koijen
  • Motohiro Yogo

We summarize recent trends in risk exposure for U.S. life insurers from variable annuities, shadow insurance, securities lending, and derivatives. We discuss how these sources of risk could be amplified and transmitted to the rest of the financial sector and the real economy. More complete and transparent financial statements are necessary to accurately assess the overall risk mismatch in the insurance industry. We suggest ways to disclose relevant information and discuss some implications for insurance regulation.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w23365.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23365.

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Date of creation: Apr 2017
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23365
Note: AP
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  1. Ralph S. J. Koijen & Motohiro Yogo, 2015. "The Cost of Financial Frictions for Life Insurers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(1), pages 445-475, January.
  2. Ralph S.J. Koijen & Stijn Nieuwerburgh & Motohiro Yogo, 2016. "Health and Mortality Delta: Assessing the Welfare Cost of Household Insurance Choice," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(2), pages 957-1010, 04.
  3. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Lasse Heje Pedersen, 2009. "Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(6), pages 2201-2238, June.
  4. Andrew Ellul & Chotibhak Jotikasthira & Christian T. Lundblad & Yihui Wang, 2015. "Is Historical Cost Accounting a Panacea? Market Stress, Incentive Distortions, and Gains Trading," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 70(6), pages 2489-2538, December.
  5. Bo Becker & Victoria Ivashina, 2015. "Reaching for Yield in the Bond Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 70(5), pages 1863-1902, October.
  6. Kenneth A. Froot, 2007. "Risk Management, Capital Budgeting, and Capital Structure Policy for Insurers and Reinsurers," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 74(2), pages 273-299.
  7. Merrill, Craig B. & Nadauld, Taylor & Stulz, Rene M. & Sherlund, Shane M., 2012. "Did Capital Requirements and Fair Value Accounting Spark Fire Sales in Distressed Mortgage-Backed Securities?," Working Paper Series 2012-12, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
  8. Robert McDonald & Anna Paulson, 2015. "AIG in Hindsight," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 81-106, Spring.
  9. Foley-Fisher, Nathan & Narajabad, Borghan N. & Verani, Stephane, 2015. "Self-fulfilling Runs: Evidence from the U.S. Life Insurance Industry," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-32, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  10. John Y. Campbell, Robert J. Shiller, 1988. "The Dividend-Price Ratio and Expectations of Future Dividends and Discount Factors," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 1(3), pages 195-228.
  11. J. David Cummins & Mary A. Weiss, 2014. "Systemic Risk and The U.S. Insurance Sector," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 81(3), pages 489-528, 09.
  12. Robert Novy‐Marx & Joshua Rauh, 2011. "Public Pension Promises: How Big Are They and What Are They Worth?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(4), pages 1211-1249, 08.
  13. Bo Becker & Marcus Opp, 2013. "Regulatory reform and risk-taking: replacing ratings," NBER Working Papers 19257, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Ellul, Andrew & Jotikasthira, Chotibhak & Lundblad, Christian T & Wang, Yihui, 2015. "Is Historical Cost Accounting a Panacea? Market Stress, Incentive Distortions, and Gains Trading," CEPR Discussion Papers 10450, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Juliane Begenau & Monika Piazzesi & Martin Schneider, 2015. "Banks' Risk Exposures," NBER Working Papers 21334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh & Motohiro Yogo & Ralph S.J. Koijen, 2009. "Optimal Health and Longevity Insurance," 2009 Meeting Papers 185, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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