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Urban Productivity in the Developing World

Listed author(s):
  • Edward L. Glaeser
  • Wentao Xiong

Africa is urbanizing rapidly, and this creates both opportunities and challenges. Labor productivity appears to be much higher in developing-world cities than in rural areas, and historically urbanization is strongly correlated with economic growth. Education seems to be a strong complement to urbanization, and entrepreneurial human capital correlates strongly with urban success. Immigrants provide a natural source of entrepreneurship, both in the U.S. and in Africa, which suggests that making African cities more livable can generate economic benefits by attracting talent. Reducing the negative externalities of urban life requires a combination of infrastructure, incentives, and institutions. Appropriate institutions can mean independent public authorities, public-private partnerships, and non-profit entities depending on the setting.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23279.

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Date of creation: Mar 2017
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23279
Note: DEV PR
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  2. Gilles Duranton & Matthew A. Turner, 2011. "The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion: Evidence from US Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(6), pages 2616-2652, October.
  3. Glaeser, Edward L. & Ponzetto, Giacomo A. M. & Shleifer, Andrei, 2016. "Securing Property Rights," Working Paper Series rwp16-040, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
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  7. Juan Pablo Chauvin & Edward Glaeser & Kristina Tobio, 2016. "What is Different about Urbanization in Rich and Poor Countries? Cities in Brazil, China, India and the United States," Working Papers 2016.03, International Network for Economic Research - INFER.
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  11. Oliver Hart & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1997. "The Proper Scope of Government: Theory and an Application to Prisons," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1127-1161.
  12. Edward L. Glaeser & Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2015. "Entrepreneurship and Urban Growth: An Empirical Assessment with Historical Mines," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(2), pages 498-520, May.
  13. Brandt, Loren & Van Biesebroeck, Johannes & Zhang, Yifan, 2012. "Creative accounting or creative destruction? Firm-level productivity growth in Chinese manufacturing," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 339-351.
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  22. repec:hrv:faseco:30727607 is not listed on IDEAS
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