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Creative Destruction and Subjective Wellbeing

Author

Listed:
  • Philippe Aghion
  • Ufuk Akcigit
  • Angus Deaton
  • Alexandra Roulet

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the relationship between turnover-driven growth and subjective wellbeing, using cross-sectional MSA level US data. We find that the effect of creative destruction on wellbeing is (i) unambiguously positive if we control for MSA-level unemployment, less so if we do not; (ii) more positive on future wellbeing than on current well-being; (iii) more positive in MSAs with faster growing industries or with industries that are less prone to outsourcing; (iv) more positive in MSAs within states with more generous unemployment insurance policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Philippe Aghion & Ufuk Akcigit & Angus Deaton & Alexandra Roulet, 2015. "Creative Destruction and Subjective Wellbeing," NBER Working Papers 21069, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21069
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2013. "Subjective Well-Being and Income: Is There Any Evidence of Satiation?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 598-604, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Wälde, "undated". "Stress and Coping - An Economic Approach," Working Papers 1514, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    2. Fornaro, Paolo, 2018. "Economic Dynamics and Changes in Values and Attitudes among Finnish Regions: A Descriptive Analysis," ETLA Reports 82, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    3. Philippe Aghion & Ufuk Akcigit & Angus Deaton & Alexandra Roulet, 2016. "Creative Destruction and Subjective Well-Being," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(12), pages 3869-3897, December.
    4. Kamila Cygam-Rehm & Christoph Wunder, 2018. "Do Working Hours Affect Health? Evidence from Statutory Workweek Regulations in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 967, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Kühnle, Daniel & Oberfichtner, Michael, 2017. "Bounding the Causal Effect of Unemployment on Mental Health: Nonparametric Evidence from Four Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 10652, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Koen Decancq & Alexander Michiels, 2016. "Measuring Successful Aging with Respect For What Matters To Older Persons," Working Papers 1604, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    7. Odermatt, Reto & Stutzer, Alois, 2017. "Subjective Well-Being and Public Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 11102, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • Z19 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Other

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