IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/20387.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Self-Selection into Credit Markets: Evidence from Agriculture in Mali

Author

Listed:
  • Lori Beaman
  • Dean Karlan
  • Bram Thuysbaert
  • Christopher Udry

Abstract

We examine whether returns to capital are higher for farmers who borrow than for those who do not, a direct implication of many credit market models. We measure the difference in returns through a two-stage loan and grant experiment. We find large positive investment responses and returns to grants for a random (representative) sample of farmers, showing that liquidity constraints bind. However, we find zero returns to grants for a sample of farmers who endogenously did not borrow. Thus we find important heterogeneity, even conditional on a wide range of observed characteristics, which has critical implications for theory and policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Lori Beaman & Dean Karlan & Bram Thuysbaert & Christopher Udry, 2014. "Self-Selection into Credit Markets: Evidence from Agriculture in Mali," NBER Working Papers 20387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20387
    Note: DEV LE LS
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w20387.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lori Beaman & Dean Karlan & Bram Thuysbaert & Christopher Udry, 2013. "Profitability of Fertilizer: Experimental Evidence from Female Rice Farmers in Mali," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 381-386, May.
    2. Tavneet Suri, 2011. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(1), pages 159-209, January.
    3. Jessica Cohen & Pascaline Dupas & Simone Schaner, 2015. "Price Subsidies, Diagnostic Tests, and Targeting of Malaria Treatment: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(2), pages 609-645, February.
    4. Suresh de Mel & David McKenzie & Christopher Woodruff, 2009. "Returns to Capital in Microenterprises: Evidence from a Field Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(1), pages 423-423.
    5. Orazio Attanasio & Britta Augsburg & Ralph De Haas & Emla Fitzsimons & Heike Harmgart, 2011. "Group lending or individual lending? Evidence from a randomised field experiment in Mongolia," IFS Working Papers W11/20, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    6. Augsburg, Britta & de Haas, Ralph & Harmgart, Heike & Meghir, Costas, 2014. "Microfinance at the margin: Experimental evidence from Bosnia and Herzegovina," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2014-304, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Inna Cintina & Inessa Love, 2014. "The Miracle of Microfinance Revisited: Evidence from Propensity Score Matching," Working Papers 2014-14, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    2. Karlan, Dean & Knight, Ryan & Udry, Christopher, 2015. "Consulting and capital experiments with microenterprise tailors in Ghana," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 281-302.
    3. B. Kelsey Jack & Paulina Oliva & Christopher Severen & Elizabeth Walker & Samuel Bell, 2015. "Technology Adoption Under Uncertainty: Take-Up and Subsequent Investment in Zambia," NBER Working Papers 21414, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. G√ľnther Fink & B. Kelsey Jack & Felix Masiye, 2018. "Seasonal Liquidity, Rural Labor Markets and Agricultural Production," NBER Working Papers 24564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. repec:eee:wdevel:v:105:y:2018:i:c:p:189-200 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Diego A.Vera-Cossio, 2017. "Targeting Credit through Community Members," PIER Discussion Papers 78, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Dec 2017.
    7. Marshall Burke & Lauren Falcao Bergquist & Edward Miguel, 2018. "Sell Low and Buy High: Arbitrage and Local Price Effects in Kenyan Markets," NBER Working Papers 24476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Inna Cintina & Inessa Love, 2014. "The Miracle of Microfinance Revisited: Evidence from Propensity Score Matching," Working Papers 201424, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    9. Nittai K. Bergman & Rajkamal Iyer & Richard T. Thakor, 2015. "Financial Accelerator at Work: Evidence from Corn Fields," NBER Working Papers 21086, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • D92 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice, Investment, Capacity, and Financing
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q14 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Finance

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20387. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.