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The Importance of Parental Knowledge and Social Norms: Evidence from Weight Report Cards in Mexico

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  • Silvia Prina
  • Heather Royer

Abstract

The rise of childhood obesity in less developed countries is often overlooked. We study the impact of body weight report cards in Mexico. The report cards increased parental knowledge and shifted parental attitudes about children's weight. We observe no meaningful changes in parental behaviors or children's body mass index. Interestingly, parents of children in the most obese classrooms were less likely to report that their obese child weighed too much relative to those in the least obese classrooms. As obesity rates increase, reference points for appropriate body weights may rise, making it more difficult to lower obesity rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Silvia Prina & Heather Royer, 2013. "The Importance of Parental Knowledge and Social Norms: Evidence from Weight Report Cards in Mexico," NBER Working Papers 19344, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19344
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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