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Testing Long-Run Productivity Models for the Canadian and U.S. Agricultural Sectors

  • Susan M. Capalbo
  • Michael Denny

This paper discusses a portion of our work linking data on the agriculture sector in the United States and Canada. The purpose of this work is to explore the evolution of gains in agricultural productivity in the two countries during the post-WWII period. Comparable data has been developed for each country and a series of tests have been applied about the nature of the long-run production sector. These tests are designed to evaluate the alternate possible structures of shifts in the long-run technology over time.There is considerable evidence in both countries that the long-run shifts have been Hicks Neutral in models that use gross, not net, output measures. The reverse is true for the net output models. The use of the conventional net output measures is strongly rejected. However there is evidence, in both countries, in support of the hypothesis that separability of a type that is similar to, but weaker, than real-value added is not rejected.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 1764.

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Date of creation: Oct 1985
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as AJAE, Vol. 68, no. 3 (1986): 615-625.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:1764
Note: PR
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  1. Berndt, Ernst R & Wood, David O, 1975. "Technology, Prices, and the Derived Demand for Energy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(3), pages 259-68, August.
  2. Denny, Michael & May, Doug, 1977. "The existence of a real value-added function in the Canadian manufacturing sector," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 55-69, January.
  3. Blackorby, Charles & Primont, Daniel & Russell, R. Robert, 1977. "On testing separability restrictions with flexible functional forms," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 195-209, March.
  4. May, J D & Denny, M, 1979. "Factor-Augmenting Technical Progress and Productivity in U.S. Manufacturing," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 20(3), pages 759-74, October.
  5. Denny, Michael & Fuss, Melvyn A, 1977. "The Use of Approximation Analysis to Test for Separability and the Existence of Consistent Aggregates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 404-18, June.
  6. Ernst R. Berndt & Bronwyn H. Hall & Robert E. Hall & Jerry A. Hausman, 1974. "Estimation and Inference in Nonlinear Structural Models," NBER Chapters, in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 3, number 4, pages 653-665 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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