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Testing Long-Run Productivity Models for the Canadian and U.S. Agricultural Sectors

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  • Susan M. Capalbo
  • Michael Denny

Abstract

This paper discusses a portion of our work linking data on the agriculture sector in the United States and Canada. The purpose of this work is to explore the evolution of gains in agricultural productivity in the two countries during the post-WWII period. Comparable data has been developed for each country and a series of tests have been applied about the nature of the long-run production sector. These tests are designed to evaluate the alternate possible structures of shifts in the long-run technology over time.There is considerable evidence in both countries that the long-run shifts have been Hicks Neutral in models that use gross, not net, output measures. The reverse is true for the net output models. The use of the conventional net output measures is strongly rejected. However there is evidence, in both countries, in support of the hypothesis that separability of a type that is similar to, but weaker, than real-value added is not rejected.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan M. Capalbo & Michael Denny, 1985. "Testing Long-Run Productivity Models for the Canadian and U.S. Agricultural Sectors," NBER Working Papers 1764, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:1764 Note: PR
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. D. W. Jorgenson & Z. Griliches, 1967. "The Explanation of Productivity Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(3), pages 249-283.
    2. Ernst R. Berndt & Bronwyn H. Hall & Robert E. Hall & Jerry A. Hausman, 1974. "Estimation and Inference in Nonlinear Structural Models," NBER Chapters,in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 3, number 4, pages 653-665 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Denny, Michael & May, Doug, 1977. "The existence of a real value-added function in the Canadian manufacturing sector," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 55-69, January.
    4. Berndt, Ernst R & Wood, David O, 1975. "Technology, Prices, and the Derived Demand for Energy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(3), pages 259-268, August.
    5. May, J D & Denny, M, 1979. "Factor-Augmenting Technical Progress and Productivity in U.S. Manufacturing," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 20(3), pages 759-774, October.
    6. Blackorby, Charles & Primont, Daniel & Russell, R. Robert, 1977. "On testing separability restrictions with flexible functional forms," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 195-209, March.
    7. Denny, Michael & Fuss, Melvyn A, 1977. "The Use of Approximation Analysis to Test for Separability and the Existence of Consistent Aggregates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 404-418, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lin, Ni & Davis, George C. & Shumway, C. Richard, 1998. "Aggregation Without Separability: Tests Of U.S. And Mexican Agricultural Production Data," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 20927, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Shumway, C. Richard & Davis, George C., 2001. "Does consistent aggregation really matter?," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 45(2), June.
    3. Shumway, C. Richard, 1993. "Production economics: Worthwhile investment?," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 89-108, August.
    4. Friesen, J. & Capalbo, S. & Denny, M., 1992. "Dynamic factor demand equations in U.S. and Canadian agriculture," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 6(3), pages 251-266, February.
    5. Espey, Molly & Thilmany, Dawn D., 2000. "Farm Labor Demand: A Meta-Regression Analysis Of Wage Elasticities," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 25(01), July.
    6. Robert G. Chambers & Erik Lichtenberg, 1994. "Simple Econometrics of Pesticide Productivity," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 76(3), pages 407-417.
    7. Ashok Mishra & Charles Moss & Kenneth Erickson, 2004. "Valuing farmland with multiple quasi-fixed inputs," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(15), pages 1669-1675.
    8. Veeman, T.S. & Fantino, A.A. & Rahuma, A.A., 1989. "Productivity Growth and Profitability in the Prarie Grains Sector," Project Report Series 232075, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
    9. Chambers, Robert G. & Pope, Rulon D., 1993. "A Virtually Ideal Production System: Specifying and Estimating the VIPS Model," Working Papers 197785, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    10. Bashir, Kamaleldin Ali, 1990. "Technical change in Iowa agricultural production: a conditional demand approach," ISU General Staff Papers 1990010108000017619, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    11. Matthew Andersen & Julian Alston & Philip Pardey, 2012. "Capital use intensity and productivity biases," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 59-71, February.
    12. Chambers, Robert G. & Pope, Rulon D., 1989. "What Do Aggregate Agricultural Supply and Demand Curves Mean?," Working Papers 197605, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    13. Paul E. Brockway & Matthew K. Heun & João Santos & John R. Barrett, 2017. "Energy-Extended CES Aggregate Production: Current Aspects of Their Specification and Econometric Estimation," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-23, February.
    14. Qinghua Liu & C. Richard Shumway, 2004. "Testing aggregation consistency across geography and commodities," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 48(3), pages 463-486, September.
    15. Thilmany, Dawn D. & Espey, Molly, 1998. "Farm Labor Demand And Supply: A Meta-Analysis Of Wage Elasticities," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 21001, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    16. Moss, Charles B. & Erickson, Kenneth W. & Ball, V. Eldon & Mishra, Ashok K., 2003. "A Translog Cost Function Analysis Of U.S. Agriculture: A Dynamic Specification," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22027, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    17. Thirtle, Colin, 1988. "Induced Innovation Theory and Agricultural Development in LDCs: An Appraisal," Manchester Working Papers in Agricultural Economics 232807, University of Manchester, School of Economics, Agricultural Economics Department.
    18. Chambers, Robert G. & Pope, Rulon D., 1989. "What Do Aggregate Agricultural Supply and Demand Curves Mean?," 1990 Conference (34th), February 13-15, 1990, Brisbane, Australia 144922, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    19. Aradhyula, Satheesh Venkata, 1989. "Policy structure, output supply and input demand for US crops," ISU General Staff Papers 198901010800009909, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    20. Krakar, Janice Eileen, 1990. "Canadian agriculture factor retention under different policy regimes," ISU General Staff Papers 1990010108000010380, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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