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China's Rising Demand for "Green Cities": Evidence from Cross-City Real Estate Price Hedonics

Author

Listed:
  • Siqi Zheng
  • Jing Cao
  • Matthew E. Kahn

Abstract

With the decline of the traditional hukou system, migrants in China have a broad set of cities to choose from. Within an open system of cities, compensating differentials theory predicts that local real estate prices will reflect the marginal valuation of non-market local public goods. More polluted cities will feature lower real estate prices. But, local pollution may be caused by booming local industries. To address such endogeneity concerns, we estimate hedonic regressions using an instrumental variable strategy based on "imports" of pollution from nearby sources. By documenting the importance of spatial emissions patterns, our study highlights how real estate prices in one city are affected by Pigouvian externalities originating in another location. On average, a 10% decrease in imported neighbor pollution is associated with a 1.8% increase in local home prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Siqi Zheng & Jing Cao & Matthew E. Kahn, 2011. "China's Rising Demand for "Green Cities": Evidence from Cross-City Real Estate Price Hedonics," NBER Working Papers 16992, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16992
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w16992.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gyourko, Joseph & Tracy, Joseph, 1991. "The Structure of Local Public Finance and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 774-806, August.
    2. Zheng, Siqi & Kahn, Matthew E. & Liu, Hongyu, 2010. "Towards a system of open cities in China: Home prices, FDI flows and air quality in 35 major cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-10, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. China's Future Green Cities
      by Matthew E. Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2011-12-02 22:10:00
    2. “Green People Power” in China
      by Matthew E. Kahn in The Reality-Based Community on 2012-10-29 03:09:57
    3. My Harvard Business Review Blog Piece on China's Bullet Trains and a History of My Economic Thought About China
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2013-04-08 20:50:00
    4. Exploring Green Cities in China
      by Matthew Kahn in Urbanization Project on 2013-04-10 04:17:09

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Dengke & Chen, Shiyi, 2017. "Particulate air pollution and real estate valuation: Evidence from 286 Chinese prefecture-level cities over 2004–2013," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 884-897.
    2. Wenjie Wu, 2012. "Does Public Investment Spur the Land Market?: Evidence from Transport Improvement in Beijing," SERC Discussion Papers 0116, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    3. Huang, Daisy J. & Leung, Charles K. & Qu, Baozhi, 2015. "Do bank loans and local amenities explain Chinese urban house prices?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 19-38.
    4. Zheng, Siqi & Wu, Jing & Kahn, Matthew E. & Deng, Yongheng, 2012. "The nascent market for “green” real estate in Beijing," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(5), pages 974-984.
    5. Jing Wu & Yongheng Deng & Jun Huang & Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung, 2013. "Incentives and Outcomes: China's Environmental Policy," NBER Working Papers 18754, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

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