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Facts and Fallacies about U.S. FDI in China

  • Lee Branstetter
  • C. Fritz Foley
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    Despite the rapid expansion of U.S.-China trade ties, the increase in U.S. FDI in China, and the expanding amount of economic research exploring these developments, a number of misconceptions distort the popular understanding of U.S. multinationals in China. In this paper, we seek to correct four common misunderstandings by providing a statistical portrait of several aspects of U.S. affiliate activity in the country and placing this activity in its appropriate economic context.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w13470.pdf
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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13470.

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    Date of creation: Oct 2007
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    Publication status: published as Facts and Fallacies about U.S. FDI in China , Lee Branstetter, C. Fritz Foley. in China's Growing Role in World Trade , Feenstra and Wei. 2010
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13470
    Note: ITI
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    1. Daniel H. Rosen, 1999. "Behind the Open Door: Foreign Enterprises in the Chinese Marketplace," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 23.
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    8. repec:rus:hseeco:121605 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Pol Antràs & Mihir A. Desai & C. Fritz Foley, 2009. "Multinational Firms, FDI Flows, and Imperfect Capital Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1171-1219, August.
    10. Peter K. Schott, 2008. "The relative sophistication of Chinese exports," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 23, pages 5-49, 01.
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    12. Barry Naughton, 1996. "China's Emergence and Prospects as a Trading Nation," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 273-344.
    13. Morris Goldstein & Nicholas R. Lardy, 2004. "What Kind of Landing for the Chinese Economy?," Policy Briefs PB04-07, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
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