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Innovation in China: the rise of Chinese inventors in the production of knowledge

Author

Listed:
  • Rachel Griffith

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and IFS and Manchester)

  • Helen Miller

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies)

Abstract

In 2010 China was the world's fourth largest filer of patent applications. This followed a decade of unprecedented increases in investment in skills and Research and Development. If current trends continue China could rank first in the very near future. We provide evidence that the growth in Chinese patenting activity has been accompanied by a growth in Chinese inventors creating technologies that are near to the science base. Part of the success of China has been to attract the investment of foreign multinationals. This is also true for a number of other Emerging Economies. Europe's largest multinational firms increasingly file patent applications that are based on inventor activities located in emerging economies, often working alongside inventors from the firm's home country.

Suggested Citation

  • Rachel Griffith & Helen Miller, 2011. "Innovation in China: the rise of Chinese inventors in the production of knowledge," IFS Working Papers W11/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:11/15
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    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/wps/wp1115.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ajay Agrawal & Avi Goldfarb, 2008. "Restructuring Research: Communication Costs and the Democratization of University Innovation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1578-1590, September.
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    4. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg & Rebecca Henderson, 1993. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 577-598.
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    6. Dalia Marin, 2006. "A New International Division of Labor in Europe: Outsourcing and Offshoring to Eastern Europe," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(2-3), pages 612-622, 04-05.
    7. Puga, Diego & Trefler, Daniel, 2010. "Wake up and smell the ginseng: International trade and the rise of incremental innovation in low-wage countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 64-76, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Iizuka, M. & Thutupalli, A., 2014. "Globalization, the rise of biotechnology and catching up in agricultural innovation: The case of Bt technology in India," MERIT Working Papers 054, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Chu, Angus C. & Cozzi, Guido & Galli, Silvia, 2014. "Stage-dependent intellectual property rights," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 239-249.
    3. Giuditta De Prato & Daniel Nepelski, 2012. "Global R&D network. A network analysis of international R&D centres," JRC Working Papers JRC79478, Joint Research Centre (Seville site), revised Nov 2012.
    4. Soonwoo Kwon & Jihong Lee & Sokbae (Simon) Lee, 2014. "International trends in technological progress: stylized facts from patent citations, 1980-2011," CeMMAP working papers CWP16/14, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. repec:bla:reviec:v:25:y:2017:i:1:p:1-20 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:spr:manint:v:54:y:2014:i:2:d:10.1007_s11575-013-0185-0 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; innovation; offshoring; patents.;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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