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China's Embrace of Globalization

  • Lee Branstetter
  • Nicholas Lardy
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    As China has become an increasingly important part of the global trading system over the past two decades, interest in the country and its international economic policies has increased among international economists who are not China specialists. This paper represents an attempt to provide the international economics community with a succinct summary of the major steps in the evolution of Chinese policy toward international trade and foreign direct investment and their consequences since the late 1970s. In doing so, we draw upon and update a number of more comprehensive book-length treatments of the subject. It is our hope that this paper will prove to be a useful resource for the growing numbers of international economists who are exploring China-related issues, either in the classroom or in their own research.

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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12373.

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    Date of creation: Jul 2006
    Date of revision:
    Publication status: published as Brandt, Loren and Thomas Rawski (eds.) China’s Economic Transition: Origins, Mechanisms, and Consequences. Cambridge University Press, 2008.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12373
    Note: ITI
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    19. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521414951 is not listed on IDEAS
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