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Race and Charitable Church Activity

  • Daniel M. Hungerman

The availability of public funding for charitable church activity has increased dramatically in the past decade. A key dispute over this increased availability is whether congregations' propensity to provide charitable services depends upon the racial composition of the community served. This paper uses three different congregation-level datasets to investigate how race affects charitable church activity. In all three datasets there is evidence that all-white congregations become less charitably active as the share of black residents in the local community grows. This response is found only when looking at charitable activities, not when looking at other types of church activity. Additionally, all-white congregations favorably disposed towards receiving government funding do not respond differently to black residents than do congregations which are not all-white.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w13323.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13323.

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Date of creation: Aug 2007
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Publication status: published as Daniel M. Hungerman, 2008. "Race And Charitable Church Activity," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 46(3), pages 380-400, 07.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13323
Note: CH PE
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