IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/12385.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Innovation, Diffusion, and Trade

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan Eaton
  • Samuel Kortum

Abstract

We explore the determinants of research specialization across countries and its consequences for relative wages. Using a dynamic Ricardian model we examine the effects of faster international technology diffusion and lower trade barriers on the incentive to innovate. In the absence of any diffusion at all, countries devote the same share of resources toward research regardless of trade barriers or research productivity. As long as trade barriers are not too high, faster diffusion shifts research activity toward the country that does it better. This shift in research activity raises the relative wage there. It can even mean that, with more diffusion, the country better at research ends up with a larger share of technologies in its exclusive domain.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Eaton & Samuel Kortum, 2006. "Innovation, Diffusion, and Trade," NBER Working Papers 12385, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12385
    Note: ITI PR
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w12385.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eaton, Jonathan & Kortum, Samuel, 2001. "Trade in capital goods," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(7), pages 1195-1235.
    2. Andrew B. Bernard & Jonathan Eaton & J. Bradford Jensen & Samuel Kortum, 2003. "Plants and Productivity in International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1268-1290, September.
    3. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-351, March.
    4. Jonathan Eaton & Eva Gutierrez & Samuel Kortum, 1998. "European technology policy," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 13(27), pages 403-438, October.
    5. Gino A.Gancia, 2003. "Globalization, Divergence and Stagnation," Development Working Papers 174, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    6. Eaton, Jonathan & Kortum, Samuel, 1999. "International Technology Diffusion: Theory and Measurement," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 537-570, August.
    7. Jonathan Eaton & Samuel Kortum, 2002. "Technology, Geography, and Trade," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(5), pages 1741-1779, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Nan Li & Ana Maria Santacreu & Jie Cai, 2016. "Knowledge Diffusion and Trade Across Countries and Sectors," 2016 Meeting Papers 650, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Valentina Bosetti & Melanie Heugues & Alessandro Tavoni, 2017. "Luring others into climate action: coalition formation games with threshold and spillover effects," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(2), pages 410-431.
    3. Giammario Impullitti, 2016. "Global Innovation Races, Offshoring and Wage Inequality," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(1), pages 171-202, February.
    4. Cai, Jie & Li, Nan & Santacreu, Ana Maria, 2017. "Knowledge Diffusion, Trade and Innovation Across Countries and Sectors," Working Papers 2017-29, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    5. Natalia Ramondo & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 2013. "Trade, Multinational Production, and the Gains from Openness," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 121(2), pages 273-322.
    6. Li, Yao Amber, 2010. "International Trade, Technology Diffusion, and the Role of Diffusion Barriers," MPRA Paper 39409, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Dec 2011.
    7. Andres Rodriguez-Clare, 2007. "Trade, Diffusion and the Gains from Openness," NBER Working Papers 13662, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Ju, Jiandong & Yang, Xuebing, 2009. "Hicks theorem: Effects of technological improvement in the Ricardian model," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 239-247, March.
    9. Gao, Xiang, 2009. "Macroeconomic Analysis on the Basis of Trade Theory: A Review Essay," MPRA Paper 18380, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12385. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: () or (Joanne Lustig). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.