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Old sins cast long shadows: The Long-term impact of the resettlement of the Sudetenland on residential migration

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  • Martin Guzi

    (Masaryk University)

  • Peter Huber

    (Austrian Institute for Economic Research)

  • Stepan Mikula

    (Masaryk University)

Abstract

We analyze the long-term impact of the resettlement of the Sudetenland after World War~II on residential migration. This event involved expulsion of ethnic Germans and almost complete depopulation of an area of a country and its rapid resettlement by 2 million Czech inhabitants. Results based on nearest neighbor matching and regression discontinuity design show a higher population churn in resettled areas that continues today. The populations in resettled areas and in the remainder of the country share similar values and do not differ statistically in terms of their propensity to give donations, attend social events, and participate in voluntary work. However, we observe that resettled settlements have fewer local club memberships, lower turnout in municipal elections, and less frequently organized social events. This finding indicates substantially lower local social capital in the resettled settlements that is likely to have caused higher residential migration. This explanation is consistent with theoretical models of the impact of social capital on migration decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Guzi & Peter Huber & Stepan Mikula, 2019. "Old sins cast long shadows: The Long-term impact of the resettlement of the Sudetenland on residential migration," MUNI ECON Working Papers 2019-07, Masaryk University, revised Feb 2023.
  • Handle: RePEc:mub:wpaper:2019-07
    DOI: 10.5817/WP_MUNI_ECON_2019-07
    Note: License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Geraci, Andrea & Nardotto, Mattia & Reggiani, Tommaso & Sabatini, Fabio, 2022. "Broadband Internet and social capital," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 206(C).
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    Cited by:

    1. Diya Abraham & Ben Greiner & Marianne Stephanides, 2021. "On the Internet you can be anyone: An experiment on strategic avatar choice in online marketplaces," MUNI ECON Working Papers 2021-02, Masaryk University, revised Feb 2023.
    2. Štěpán Mikula & Mariola Pytliková, 2020. "Air Pollution & Migration: Exploiting a Natural Experiment from the Czech Republic," EconPol Working Paper 43, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    3. Grossmann, Jakub & Jurajda, Štepán & Roesel, Felix, 2021. "Forced Migration, Staying Minorities, and New Societies: Evidence from Post-War Czechoslovakia," IZA Discussion Papers 14191, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Rostislav Staněk & Ondřej Krčál & Štěpán Mikula, 2021. "Social Capital and Mobility: An Experimental Study," MUNI ECON Working Papers 2021-12, Masaryk University, revised Feb 2023.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Social Capital; Sudetenland;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N44 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Europe: 1913-
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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