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New Zealand: A Typical Australasian Ecomony?


  • Arthur Grimes

    () (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)


We examine trend economic developments in New Zealand and in each of Australia's six states and two territories (i.e. nine regions) in order to inform issues regarding economic policy harmonisation across Australasia. Our focus is on trend developments in GDP, population, GDP per capita and employment (each at regional level), and in sectoral industry shares within each region. By comparing New Zealand developments with those in the eight Australian regions, we infer whether New Zealand's developments have been typical of those experienced elsewhere in Australasia. Examination of development trends also indicates the nature of the development process across Australasian regions. For instance, we examine the extent to which certain regions are experiencing growth in high-value industries (such as business and financial services), and examine the degree to which some are dependent on primary industries, including agriculture and mining. Analysis of all the data indicates that, while New Zealand has some idiosyncratic features, it is reasonable to regard it as a "typical" Australasian economy in many respects.

Suggested Citation

  • Arthur Grimes, 2004. "New Zealand: A Typical Australasian Ecomony?," Working Papers 04_11, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:04_11

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lewis Evans & Arthur Grimes & Bryce Wilkinson, 1996. "Economic Reform in New Zealand 1984-95: The Pursuit of Efficiency," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(4), pages 1856-1902, December.
    2. Nils Björksten & Özer Karagedikli & Christopher Plantier & Arthur Grimes, 2004. "What Does the Taylor Rule Say About a New Zealand-Australia Currency Union?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(s1), pages 34-42, September.
    3. Russell Cooper & Hubert Kempf, 2004. "Overturning Mundell: Fiscal Policy in a Monetary Union," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(2), pages 371-396.
    4. Dean Parham, 2002. "Productivity and Policy Reform in Australia," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 5, pages 53-63, Fall.
    5. Melleny Black & Melody Guy & Nathan McLellan, 2003. "Productivity in New Zealand 1988 to 2002," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 119-150.
    6. Cashin, Paul, 1995. "Economic Growth and Convergence across the Seven Colonies of Australasia: 1861-1991," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 71(213), pages 132-144, June.
    7. Dean R. Hyslop & David C. Maré, 2003. "Understanding New Zealand's Changing Income Distribution 1983-98: A Semiparametric Analysis," Working Papers 03_16, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    8. Dean R. Hyslop & David C. Maré, 2005. "Understanding New Zealand's Changing Income Distribution, 1983-1998: A Semi-parametric Analysis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 72(3), pages 469-495, August.
    9. Suzi Kerr, 2003. "Indigenous Forests and Forest Sink Policy in New Zealand," Working Papers 03_15, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Grimes, Arthur, 2005. "Regional and industry cycles in Australasia: Implications for a common currency," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 380-397, June.
    2. Grimes, Arthur & Le Vaillant, Jason & McCann, Philip, 2011. "Auckland's Knowledge Economy: Australasian and European Comparisons," Occasional Papers 11/2, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
    3. Arthur Grimes, 2005. "Intra & Inter-Regional Industry Shocks: A New Metric with an Application to Australasian Currency Union," Macroeconomics 0509019, EconWPA.
    4. Procter, Roger, 2011. "Echanching Productivity: Towards an Updated Action Agenda," Occasional Papers 11/1, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
    5. Arthur Grimes, 2005. "Intra & Inter-Regional Shocks: A New Metric with an Application to Australasian Currency Union," Working Papers 05_03, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    6. Michelle Poland & David C Maré, 2005. "Defining Geographic Communities," Urban/Regional 0509016, EconWPA.
    7. David C Maré, 2005. "Indirect Effects of Active Labour Market Policies," HEW 0509004, EconWPA.
    8. Jacques Poot, 2009. "Trans-Tasman Migration, Transnationalism and Economic Development in Australasia," Working Papers 09_05, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

    More about this item


    Australia; New Zealand; Economic Union; Sectoral Development;

    JEL classification:

    • N17 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Africa; Oceania
    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O56 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Oceania
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes


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