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Economic Growth and Convergence Across the Seven Colonies of Australia: 1861-1991

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  • Cashin, P.A.

Abstract

Have the poor economies of Australasia grown faster than the rich ones? This question is analyzed for the seven colonies of Australasia for the period 1861-1991 and it is found that the levels of per-capita income across the colonies are converging to one another: the initially poor colonies have indeed grown faster. The cross-sectional dispersion of per-capita incomes also declined between 1861-1991, but most of this decline occurred in the prefederation 1861-1901 period as the extent of dispersion in 1991 is very close to that attained in 1901. Copyright 1995 by The Economic Society of Australia.
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Suggested Citation

  • Cashin, P.A., 1993. "Economic Growth and Convergence Across the Seven Colonies of Australia: 1861-1991," Papers 688, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:yalegr:688
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    Cited by:

    1. Serge Coulombe, 2000. "New Evidence of Convergence Across Canadian Provinces: The Role of Urbanization," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 713-725.
    2. Ian W. Mclean, 2004. "Australian Economic Growth in Historical Perspective," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(250), pages 330-345, September.
    3. Michele Coscia & Timothy Cheston & Ricardo Hausmann, 2017. "Institutions vs. Social Interactions in Driving Economic Convergence: Evidence from Colombia," CID Working Papers 331, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    4. Ray, Rita, 2013. "Revisiting Convergence: A case study form American States," MPRA Paper 57405, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Nicola Gennaioli & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez De Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2014. "Growth in regions," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 19(3), pages 259-309, September.
      • Nicola Gennaioli & Rafael LaPorta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, "undated". "Growth in Regions," Working Paper 73436, Harvard University OpenScholar.
      • Nicola Gennaioli & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez de Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2013. "Growth in Regions," NBER Working Papers 18937, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Laura Panza & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2017. "Australian Exceptionalism? Inequality and Living Standards 1821-1871," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 2027, The University of Melbourne.
    7. Gabriel Rodríguez, 2006. "The role of the interprovincial transfers in the ß: Further empirical evidence for Canada," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 12-29, January.
    8. DOBSON, Steve & RAMLOGAN, Carlyn & STROBL, Eric, 2003. "Why do rates of convergence differ ? A meta-regression analysis," CORE Discussion Papers 2003020, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    9. Etsuro Shioji, 1992. "Regional growth in Japan," Economics Working Papers 138, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Oct 1995.
    10. Jesús Rodríguez-López & Diego Martínez-López & Diego Romero-Ávila, 2009. "Persistence of inequalities across the Spanish regions," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(4), pages 841-862, November.
    11. Stephen Dobson & Carlyn Ramlogan & Eric Strobl, 2006. "Why Do Rates Of Β-Convergence Differ? A Meta-Regression Analysis," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 53(2), pages 153-173, May.
    12. Bertram, Geoffrey, 2004. "On the Convergence of Small Island Economies with Their Metropolitan Patrons," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 343-364, February.
    13. Arthur Grimes, 2004. "New Zealand: A Typical Australasian Ecomony?," Working Papers 04_11, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    14. George Petrakos & Panagiotis Artelaris, 2009. "European Regional Convergence Revisited: A Weighted Least Squares Approach," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 314-331.
    15. John Ssozi & Simplice A. Asongu, 2016. "The Comparative Economics of Catch-up in Output per Worker, Total Factor Productivity and Technological Gain in Sub-Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 215-228, June.
    16. Andrew Henley, 2005. "On regional growth convergence in Great Britain," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(9), pages 1245-1260.
    17. Joseph DeJuan & Marc Tomljanovich, 2005. "Income convergence across Canadian provinces in the 20th century: Almost but not quite there," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 39(3), pages 567-592, September.
    18. Mahamat Hamit-Haggar, 2013. "A note on convergence across Canadian provinces: new insights from the club clustering algorithm," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(2), pages 591-601, April.
    19. Magrini, Stefano, 2004. "Regional (di)convergence," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 62, pages 2741-2796 Elsevier.
    20. Jose Martelino & S. Nuri Erbas & Adnan Mazarei & Sena Eken & Paul Cashin, 1995. "Economic Dislocation and Recovery in Lebanon," IMF Occasional Papers 120, International Monetary Fund.
    21. Ward, William A. & Hite, James C., 1999. "Asset Fixity, Asset Specificity And Regional Economic Change: Hypothesis And Implications," Working Papers 18807, Clemson University, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    22. Maria Abreu & Henri L.F. de Groot & Raymond J.G.M. Florax, 2005. "A Meta-Analysis of Beta-Convergence: The Legendary Two-Percent," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-001/3, Tinbergen Institute.

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