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Spatial and Cultural Autocorrelation in International Datasets

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  • E. Anthon Eff

Abstract

Positive autocorrelation implies that proximate observations take on similar values. “Proximate” can be defined in many different dimensions. In a cross-section of nations, it can be defined using physical distance, cultural similarity, ecological similarity, or using frequency and intensity of interaction, such as trade relationships or enemy and ally relationships. Autocorrelation of regression residuals presents well-known problems in least-squares estimation, but autocorrelation also provides useful information for exploratory data analysis and model specification. The paper shows that autocorrelation is widespread in international datasets. The paper demonstrates the usefulness of autocorrelation in uncovering stylized facts about international relations, and in specifying a least-squares model.

Suggested Citation

  • E. Anthon Eff, 2004. "Spatial and Cultural Autocorrelation in International Datasets," Working Papers 200401, Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Economics and Finance.
  • Handle: RePEc:mts:wpaper:200401
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    File URL: http://capone.mtsu.edu/berc/working/spatial%20autocorrelation.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    2. Andrew Rose, 2005. "Which International Institutions Promote International Trade?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(4), pages 682-698, September.
    3. King, Gary & Lowe, Will, 2003. "An Automated Information Extraction Tool for International Conflict Data with Performance as Good as Human Coders: A Rare Events Evaluation Design," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(03), pages 617-642, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Burhan, Nik Ahmad Sufian & Salleh, Fauzilah & Burhan, Nik Mohd Ghazi, 2015. "National Intelligence and Private Health Expenditure: Do High IQ Societies Spend More on Health Insurance?," MPRA Paper 77328, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Henseler Miriam & Plesch Joachim, 2009. "How Can Scholarship Institutions Foster the Return of Foreign Students?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 229(4), pages 382-409, August.
    3. E. Anthon Eff, 2004. "Spatial, Cultural, and Ecological Autocorrelation in U.S. Regional Data," Working Papers 200406, Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Economics and Finance.
    4. Docquier, Frédéric & Lohest, Olivier & Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2005. "Brain Drain in Developing Regions (1990-2000)," IZA Discussion Papers 1668, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spatial Autocorrelation; Culture; Religion;

    JEL classification:

    • F00 - International Economics - - General - - - General
    • C49 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Other
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

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