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The Role of Primary Commodities in Economic Development: Sub-Saharan Africa versus Rest of the World

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Listed:
  • Carmignani, Fabrizio

    (School of Economics The University of Queensland)

  • Chowdhury, Abdur

    () (Department of Economics Marquette University)

Abstract

We study the nexus between natural resources and growth in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and find that SSA is indeed special: resources dependence retards growth in SSA, but not elsewhere. The natural resources curse is thus specific to SSA. We then show that this specificity does not depend on the type of primary commodities on which SSA specializes. Instead, the SSA specificity appears to arise from the interaction between institutions and natural resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Carmignani, Fabrizio & Chowdhury, Abdur, 2010. "The Role of Primary Commodities in Economic Development: Sub-Saharan Africa versus Rest of the World," Working Papers and Research 2010-01, Marquette University, Center for Global and Economic Studies and Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrq:wpaper:2010-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    primary commodities; growth; institutions; Economics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • Q00 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - General
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies

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