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The Multidimensional Disadvantage of Australian Children with a Comparison between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Children

Author

Listed:
  • Ankita Mishra
  • Ranjan Ray
  • Leonora Risse

Abstract

This study compares the wellbeing of Indigenous children to non-Indigenous in Australia. Using a dynamic measure of multidimensional disadvantage that builds duration and persistence of disadvantage in the measure, and a unique combination of panel data sets on children, this paper provides robust evidence that shows that Indigenous children suffer considerably higher levels of disadvantage than non-Indigenous children. The multidimensional approach allows for the identification of the dimensions where the disadvantage is most profound, requiring targeted intervention. The use of the dynamic framework yields the result that the disadvantage already suffered by the Indigenous children relative to non-Indigenous children worsens on the incorporation of duration and persistence of disadvantage in the measure. The study identifies Health, Housing and Schooling as areas where the disadvantage of the Indigenous children is large. Remoteness of location is found to compound the severity child’s disadvantage.

Suggested Citation

  • Ankita Mishra & Ranjan Ray & Leonora Risse, 2016. "The Multidimensional Disadvantage of Australian Children with a Comparison between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Children," Monash Economics Working Papers 19-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2016-19
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    File URL: http://business.monash.edu/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/455093/1916australianchildrenmishrarayrisse.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Sabina Alkire, Mauricio Apablaza, Satya R. Chakravarty and Gaston Yalonetzky, 2014. "Measuring Chronic Multidimensional Poverty: A Counting Approach," OPHI Working Papers ophiwp075, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Indigenous Children; Multidimensional Deprivation; Persistence; Longitudinal Study;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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