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Social transfers and poverty in Europe: comparing social exclusion and targeting across welfare regimes

Listed author(s):
  • Massimo Baldini

    ()

  • Giovanni Gallo

    ()

  • Manuel Reverberi

    ()

  • Andrea Trapani

This paper studies whether there are systematic differences in the ability of cash transfers, belonging to different welfare systems, to reach the poor and to lift them out of poverty. We structure the analysis following the classic breakdown of the various European welfare states into welfare regimes, in search of specific features of them that can explain the variable results shown in the ability to effectively tackle economic poverty. The analysis is carried out both with a cross-sectional approach as well as using a more long-run definition of persistent poverty.

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File URL: http://155.185.68.2/campusone/web_dep/CappPaper/Capp_p145.pdf
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Paper provided by Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Economia "Marco Biagi" in its series Center for the Analysis of Public Policies (CAPP) with number 0145.

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Length: pages 29
Date of creation: Aug 2016
Handle: RePEc:mod:cappmo:0145
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.capp.unimore.it

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  1. Patricia M. Anderson & Bruce D. Meyer, 1997. "Unemployment Insurance Takeup Rates and the After-Tax Value of Benefits," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 913-937.
  2. Elena Bárcena-Martín & Maria del Carmern & Salvador Perez-Moreno, 2015. "Assessing the impact of social transfer income packages on child poverty. A European cross-national perspective," ThE Papers 15/02, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
  3. Eirini Andriopoulou & Panagiotis Tsakloglou, "undated". "The determinants of poverty transitions in Europe and the role of duration dependence," DEOS Working Papers 1120, Athens University of Economics and Business.
  4. Francesco Devicienti, 2002. "Poverty persistence in Britain: A multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991–1997," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 77(1), pages 307-340, December.
  5. Enrico Fabrizi & Maria Rosaria Ferrante & Silvia Pacei, 2014. "A Micro-Econometric Analysis of the Antipoverty Effect of Social Cash Transfers in Italy," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(2), pages 323-348, 06.
  6. Francesco Devicienti, 2002. "Poverty persistence in Britain: A multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991–1997," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 307-340, December.
  7. Martin Biewen, 2014. "Poverty persistence and poverty dynamics," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 103-103, November.
  8. Devicienti, Francesco, 2001. "Poverty persistence in Britain: a multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991-1997," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-02, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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