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Social transfers and poverty in Europe: comparing social exclusion and targeting across welfare regimes

Author

Listed:
  • Massimo Baldini
  • Giovanni Gallo
  • Manuel Reverberi
  • Andrea Trapani

Abstract

This paper studies whether there are systematic differences in the ability of cash transfers, belonging to different welfare systems, to reach the poor and to lift them out of poverty. We structure the analysis following the classic breakdown of the various European welfare states into welfare regimes, in search of specific features of them that can explain the variable results shown in the ability to effectively tackle economic poverty. The analysis is carried out both with a cross-sectional approach as well as using a more long-run definition of persistent poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Massimo Baldini & Giovanni Gallo & Manuel Reverberi & Andrea Trapani, 2016. "Social transfers and poverty in Europe: comparing social exclusion and targeting across welfare regimes," Center for the Analysis of Public Policies (CAPP) 0145, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Economia "Marco Biagi".
  • Handle: RePEc:mod:cappmo:0145
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andriopoulou, Eirini & Tsakloglou, Panagiotis, 2011. "The determinants of poverty transitions in Europe and the role of duration dependence," MPRA Paper 30659, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Elena Bárcena-Martín & Maria del Carmern & Salvador Perez-Moreno, 2015. "Assessing the impact of social transfer income packages on child poverty. A European cross-national perspective," ThE Papers 15/02, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    3. Enrico Fabrizi & Maria Rosaria Ferrante & Silvia Pacei, 2014. "A Micro-Econometric Analysis of the Antipoverty Effect of Social Cash Transfers in Italy," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(2), pages 323-348, June.
    4. Devicienti, Francesco, 2001. "Poverty persistence in Britain: a multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991-1997," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-02, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Francesco Devicienti, 2002. "Poverty persistence in Britain: A multivariate analysis using the BHPS, 1991–1997," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 307-340, December.
    6. Patricia M. Anderson & Bruce D. Meyer, 1997. "Unemployment Insurance Takeup Rates and the After-Tax Value of Benefits," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 913-937.
    7. Brady, David & Bostic, Amie, 2015. "Paradoxes of Social Policy: Welfare Transfers, Relative Poverty, and Redistribution Preferences," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 268-298.
    8. Martin Biewen, 2014. "Poverty persistence and poverty dynamics," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 103-103, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefano Boscolo & Giovanni Gallo, 2021. "The Struggle of Being Poor and Claimant: Evidence on the Non-Take-Up of Social Policies in Italy," Center for the Analysis of Public Policies (CAPP) 0174, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Economia "Marco Biagi".
    2. Gianni Betti & Francesca Gagliardi & Laura Neri, 2021. "The Heavy Burden of “Dependent Children”: An Italian Story," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(17), pages 1-12, September.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cash transfers; Poverty; Europe; Welfare Regimes; Persistent poverty.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs

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