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Does Political Knowledge Increase Support For Europe?A Cross Country Investigation Investigation of the Attitudes of European Citizens

Listed author(s):
  • Floriana Cerniglia

    ()

  • Laura Pagani

    ()

We study the impact of political knowledge on the attitudes of European citizens towards the possible distribution of responsibilities between European level institutions and national governments in three policy areas: foreign policy, defence and immigration policy. The hypothesis tested is that if citizens are not knowledgeable about how the EU works, they are more likely to be wrong about the consequences of a mismatch in the allocation of competences. In order to identify the causal e¤ect of political knowledge on attitudes we use an instrumental variables approach. The results show that more informed citizens have a considerably higher probability of being in favour of the process of EU integration.

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File URL: http://dems.unimib.it/repec/pdf/mibwpaper198.pdf
File Function: First version, 2010
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Paper provided by University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 198.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision: Oct 2010
Handle: RePEc:mib:wpaper:198
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  1. Giovanni Facchini & Anna Maria Mayda, 2008. "From individual attitudes towards migrants to migration policy outcomes: Theory and evidence," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 23, pages 651-713, October.
  2. Manfred Gärtner, 1997. "Who wants the euro – and why? Economic explanations of public attitudes towards a single European currency," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 93(3), pages 487-510, December.
  3. Author-Name: Alan S. Blinder & Alan B. Krueger, 2004. "What Does the Public Know about Economic Policy, and How Does It Know It?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 35(1), pages 327-397.
  4. Alberto Alesina & Ignazio Angeloni & Ludger Schuknecht, 2005. "What does the European Union do?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 275-319, June.
  5. Alan Blinder & Alan Krueger, 2004. "What Does the Public Know about Economic Policy, and How Does It Know It?," Working Papers 875, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  6. Alan E. Kessler & Gary P. Freeman, 2005. "Public Opinion in the EU on Immigration from Outside the Community," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(4), pages 825-850, November.
  7. repec:pri:cepsud:99blinderkrueger is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Tito Boeri & Axel Boersch-Supan & Guido Tabellini, 2002. "Pension Reforms and the Opinions of European Citizens," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 396-401, May.
  9. Floriana Cerniglia & Laura Pagani, 2009. "The European Union and the Member States: An Empirical Analysis of Europeans' Preferences for Competences Allocation," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 55(1), pages 197-232, March.
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