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The Means Testing Of Benefits And The Labour Supply Of The Wives Of Unemployed Men: Results From A Mover-Stayer Model

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  • Aedin Doris;

    () (Economics, National University of Ireland, Maynooth)

Abstract

Women married to unemployed men in Britain have lower participation rates than those married to employed men. Possible reasons include (1) husbands and wives fac-ing similar unfavourable local labour market conditions, (2) their both having characteristics which make it more likely that they will be unemployed, and (3) the means testing of benefit income, which creates a disincentive for the wife to work. These is-sues are investigated using a British survey of unemployed men and their families. Econometric results from a Mover-Stayer model indicate a limited effect of means testing on the labour supply of the wives.

Suggested Citation

  • Aedin Doris;, 1999. "The Means Testing Of Benefits And The Labour Supply Of The Wives Of Unemployed Men: Results From A Mover-Stayer Model," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n940999, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
  • Handle: RePEc:may:mayecw:n940999
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Donal O'Neill & Olive Sweetman & Brian Nolan & Tim Callan, 1998. "Female Labour supply and Income Inequality in Ireland," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n790698, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour Supply; Disincentives; Benefit System.;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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