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Credit Frictions, Collateral and the Cyclical Behaviour of the Finance Premium

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  • P-R. Agénor
  • G.J. Bratsiotis
  • D. Pfajfar

Abstract

This paper examines the behaviour of the finance premium following technology and monetary shocks in a Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) model where borrowers use a fraction of their production (output) as collateral. We show that this simple framework is capable of producing a countercyclical finance premium, while matching the macro dynamics of well-documented stylized facts. A key feature is the endogenous derivation of the default probability from break even conditions, that results in the loan rate being set as a countercyclical finance premium over the cost of borrowing from the central bank. The latter is shown to provide an accelerator effect through which shocks can amplify the loan spread and the dynamic response of macro variables.

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  • P-R. Agénor & G.J. Bratsiotis & D. Pfajfar, 2012. "Credit Frictions, Collateral and the Cyclical Behaviour of the Finance Premium," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 172, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:172
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    8. Andrea Gerali & Stefano Neri & Luca Sessa & Federico M. Signoretti, 2010. "Credit and Banking in a DSGE Model of the Euro Area," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(s1), pages 107-141, September.
    9. Roger Aliaga‐Díaz & María Pía Olivero, 2011. "The Cyclicality Of Price‐Cost Margins In Banking: An Empirical Analysis Of Its Determinants," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(1), pages 26-46, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Airaudo, Marco & Olivero, María Pía, 2014. "Optimal Monetary Policy with Counter-Cyclical Credit Spreads," School of Economics Working Paper Series 2014-1, LeBow College of Business, Drexel University.
    2. Tayler, William & Zilberman, Roy, 2014. "Macroprudential Regulation and the Role of Monetary Policy," Dynare Working Papers 37, CEPREMAP.
    3. Bratsiotis, George J. & Robinson, Wayne A., 2016. "Unit Total Costs: An Alternative Marginal Cost Proxy for Inflation Dynamics," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1826-1849.
    4. King Yoong Lim & Pengfei Jia, 2019. "Police spending and economic stabilization in a monetary economy with crime and differential human capital," NBS Discussion Papers in Economics 2019/02, Economics, Nottingham Business School, Nottingham Trent University.
    5. William Tayler & Roy Zilberman, 2017. "Unconventional Taxation Policy, Financial Frictions and Liquidity Traps," EcoMod2017 10741, EcoMod.
    6. Villa, Stefania, 2016. "Financial Frictions In The Euro Area And The United States: A Bayesian Assessment," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(5), pages 1313-1340, July.
    7. Bratsiotis, George, 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits Channel," EconStor Preprints 172770, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    8. George Bratsiotis, 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits Channel," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 243, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    9. Marco Airaudo & María Pía Olivero, 2019. "Optimal Monetary Policy with Countercyclical Credit Spreads," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 51(4), pages 787-829, June.
    10. Hristov, Nikolay & Hülsewig, Oliver, 2017. "Unexpected loan losses and bank capital in an estimated DSGE model of the euro area," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 54(PB), pages 161-186.
    11. Inekwe, John Nkwoma & Jin, Yi & Valenzuela, Ma. Rebecca, 2018. "The effects of financial distress: Evidence from US GDP growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 8-21.
    12. Leighton Vaughan Williams & Chunping Liu & Hannah Gerrard, 2019. "How well do Elo-based ratings predict professional tennis matches?," NBS Discussion Papers in Economics 2019/03, Economics, Nottingham Business School, Nottingham Trent University.
    13. William John Tayler & Roy Zilberman, 2017. "Taxation, Credit Spreads and Liquidity Traps," Working Papers 173174116, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    14. repec:lan:wpaper:68464009 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Nikolay Hristov & Oliver Hülsewig, 2016. "Unexpected Loan Losses and Bank Capital in an Estimated DSGE Model of the Euro Area," CESifo Working Paper Series 6160, CESifo.
    16. George J. Bratsiotis, 2016. "Liquidity Regulation, Monetary Policy and Welfare," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 228, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    17. Tayler, William J. & Zilberman, Roy, 2016. "Macroprudential regulation, credit spreads and the role of monetary policy," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 144-158.
    18. George J. Bratsiotis & William J. Tayler & Roy Zilberman, 2014. "Financial Regulation, Credit and Liquidity Policy and the Business Cycle," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 196, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    19. George J. Bratsiotis, 2018. "Credit Risk, Excess Reserves and Monetary Policy: The Deposits," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 236, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.

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