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Quand la réglementation environmentale profite aux pollueurs. Survol des fondements théoriques de l'hypothèse de Porter

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  • Ambec, Stefan
  • Barla, Philippe

Abstract

Cet article présente de manière non technique certains des fondements théoriques possibles de l'hypothèse de Porter selon laquelle, des réglementations environmentales strictes peuvent améliorer le profit des industries qui y sont soumises. Après une brève présentation de l'hypothèse, les arguments basés sur l'existence d'imperfections au sein de l'entreprise sont passés en revue. Les imperfections du marché susceptibles d'éventuellement justifier l'hypothèse de Porter sont ensuite discutées. Les principales conclusions de ce survol sont: i) l'hypothèse de Porter requiert l'interacton de l'externalité environmentale avec au moins une autre souce de distorsions, ii) le type d'intervention publique qui peut aboutir à un effet à la Porter dépend de la nature des distorsions qui interagissent. L'atteinte de l'optimum peut exiger l'usage de plusieurs instruments, iii) l'exploration empirique de l'hypothèse de Porter doit, pour être valide, autoriser la présence de ces multiples distorsions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ambec, Stefan & Barla, Philippe, 2005. "Quand la réglementation environmentale profite aux pollueurs. Survol des fondements théoriques de l'hypothèse de Porter," Cahiers de recherche 0504, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
  • Handle: RePEc:lvl:laeccr:0504
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Lanoie & Jérémy Laurent‐Lucchetti & Nick Johnstone & Stefan Ambec, 2011. "Environmental Policy, Innovation and Performance: New Insights on the Porter Hypothesis," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 803-842, September.
    2. Stefan Ambec & Paul Lanoie, 2007. "When and Why Does It Pay To Be Green?," CIRANO Working Papers 2007s-20, CIRANO.
    3. Ambec, Stefan & Barla, Philippe, 2005. "Can Environmental Regulations be Good for Business? an Assessment of the Porter Hypothesis," Cahiers de recherche 0505, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    4. Stefan Ambec & Mark A. Cohen & Stewart Elgie & Paul Lanoie, 2013. "The Porter Hypothesis at 20: Can Environmental Regulation Enhance Innovation and Competitiveness?," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 7(1), pages 2-22, January.
    5. Stefan Ambec & Paul Lanoie, 2009. "Performance environnementale et économique de l'entreprise," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(4), pages 71-94.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Réglementation environmentale; hypothèse de Porter; compétitivité;

    JEL classification:

    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation

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