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Regulation and Productivity

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  • Charles Dufour
  • Paul Lanoie
  • Michel Patry

Abstract

We investigate the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) and environmental regulation on the rate of growth of total factor productivity (TFP) in the Quebec manufacturing sector during the 1985–88 period. Our results show that environmental regulation and OSH protective reassignments (a prevention policy with respect to OSH) have led to a reduction in productivity growth, while the presence of mandatory prevention programs and of fines for infractions to OSH rules have led to an increase in productivity growth. Interestingly, this is, to our knowledge, the first result showing that OSH regulation may have had a positive effect on productivity growth. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Dufour & Paul Lanoie & Michel Patry, 1998. "Regulation and Productivity," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 233-247, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jproda:v:9:y:1998:i:3:p:233-247
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1018387021327
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    2. Carmichael, H Lorne, 1986. "Reputations for Safety: Market Performance and Policy Remedies," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(4), pages 458-472, October.
    3. Gollop, Frank M & Roberts, Mark J, 1983. "Environmental Regulations and Productivity Growth: The Case of Fossil-Fueled Electric Power Generation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(4), pages 654-674, August.
    4. Kennedy, Peter, 1994. "Innovation stochastique et coût de la réglementation environnementale," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 70(2), pages 199-209, juin.
    5. M. Denny & J. Bernstein & M. Fuss & S. Nakamura & L. Waverman, 1992. "Productivity in Manufacturing Industries, Canada, Japan and the United States, 1953-1986: Was the 'Productivity Slowdown' Reversed?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 25(3), pages 584-603, August.
    6. Paul Lanoie, 1992. "The Impact of Occupational Safety and Health Regulation on the Risk of Workplace Accidents: Quebec, 1983-87," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(4), pages 643-660.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ambec, Stefan & Barla, Philippe, 2005. "Can Environmental Regulations be Good for Business? an Assessment of the Porter Hypothesis," Cahiers de recherche 0505, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    2. Ambec, Stefan & Barla, Philippe, 2007. "Survol des fondements théoriques de l’hypothèse de Porter," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 83(3), pages 399-413, septembre.
    3. Albrizio, Silvia & Kozluk, Tomasz & Zipperer, Vera, 2017. "Environmental policies and productivity growth: Evidence across industries and firms," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 209-226.
    4. Abhiman Das, 2004. "Risk and Productivity Change of Public Sector Banks," Industrial Organization 0411002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Anabel Zárate-Marco & Jaime Vallés-Giménez, 2015. "Environmental tax and productivity in a decentralized context: new findings on the Porter hypothesis," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 313-339, October.
    6. Abhiman Das & Ashok Nag & Subhash Ray, 2004. "Liberalization, Ownership, and Efficiency in Indian Banking: A Nonparametric Approach," Working papers 2004-29, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    7. repec:spr:epolin:v:44:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s40812-016-0066-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Anthony N. Rezitis, 2006. "Productivity growth in the Greek banking industry: A non-parametric approach," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 9, pages 119-138, May.
    9. repec:eee:eneeco:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:271-282 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Dietrich Earnhart & Dylan G. Rassier, 2016. "“Effective regulatory stringency” and firms’ profitability: the effects of effluent limits and government monitoring," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 111-145, October.
    11. Rassier, Dylan G. & Earnhart, Dietrich, 2015. "Effects of environmental regulation on actual and expected profitability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 129-140.
    12. repec:eee:jebusi:v:101:y:2019:i:c:p:17-37 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Nikos Chatzistamoulou & George Diagourtas & Kostas Kounetas, 2017. "Do pollution abatement expenditures lead to higher productivity growth? Evidence from Greek manufacturing industries," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 19(1), pages 15-34, January.
    14. International Monetary Fund, 2001. "Bank Reform and Bank Efficiency in Pakistan," IMF Working Papers 01/138, International Monetary Fund.
    15. Bruce Domazlicky & William Weber, 2004. "Does Environmental Protection Lead to Slower Productivity Growth in the Chemical Industry?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 28(3), pages 301-324, July.
    16. Das, Abhiman & Ghosh, Saibal, 2006. "Size, Non-performing Loan, Capital and Productivity Change: Evidence from Indian State-owned Banks," MPRA Paper 17396, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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