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Understanding interpersonal violence: the impact of temperatures in Mexico

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  • Francois Cohen, Fidel Gonzalez

Abstract

We estimate the effect of temperature on criminality in Mexico and question conventional wisdom that high temperatures impact human psychology. Using high-frequency data, we find a linear effect of temperatures on criminality, inconsistent with the belief that only high temperatures cause disturbances. A significant share of weather-related crimes can be explained by higher alcohol consumption (9%) and changes in time allocation during weekends (17%). Also 28% of weather related crimes are committed at night, and temperatures are mild, and a third is driven by short term displacements, causing no additional victims.

Suggested Citation

  • Francois Cohen, Fidel Gonzalez, 2018. "Understanding interpersonal violence: the impact of temperatures in Mexico," GRI Working Papers 291, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  • Handle: RePEc:lsg:lsgwps:wp291
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    File URL: http://www.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Working-Paper-291-Cohen-Gonzalez.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ranson, Matthew, 2014. "Crime, weather, and climate change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 274-302.
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    7. Olivier Deschênes & Enrico Moretti, 2009. "Extreme Weather Events, Mortality, and Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(4), pages 659-681, November.
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    12. Ceren Baysan & Marshall Burke & Felipe González & Solomon Hsiang & Edward Miguel, 2018. "Economic and Non-Economic Factors in Violence: Evidence from Organized Crime, Suicides and Climate in Mexico," NBER Working Papers 24897, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Malvina Bondy & Sefi Roth & Lutz Sager, 2020. "Crime Is in the Air: The Contemporaneous Relationship between Air Pollution and Crime," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(3), pages 555-585.
    2. Ceren Baysan & Marshall Burke & Felipe GonzaÌ lez & Solomon Hsiang & Edward Miguel, 2019. "Economic and Non-Economic Factors in Violence: Evidence from Organized Crime, Suicides and Climate in Mexico," HiCN Working Papers 292, Households in Conflict Network.

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