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The effects of weather on crime

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  • James Horrocks
  • Andrea Kutinova Menclova

Abstract

This paper uses daily data from 43 police districts across New Zealand from 2000 to 2008 and employs panel econometric techniques to investigate the effect of weather on crime. Temperature and precipitation are found to have a significant effect on the number of violent crimes recorded, and temperature also affects the number of property crimes recorded. As an extension, the common belief that the Nor'wester wind causes ‘disorderly’ behavior is empirically investigated. Studies of this nature are important for the allocation of police resources.

Suggested Citation

  • James Horrocks & Andrea Kutinova Menclova, 2011. "The effects of weather on crime," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 231-254, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:45:y:2011:i:3:p:231-254 DOI: 10.1080/00779954.2011.572544
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ranson, Matthew, 2014. "Crime, weather, and climate change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 274-302.
    2. repec:spr:nathaz:v:87:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11069-017-2804-8 is not listed on IDEAS

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