IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/lsg/lsgwps/wp183.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Multinational corporations and climate adaptation – Are we asking the right questions? A review of current knowledge and a new research perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Alina Averchenkova
  • Florence Crick
  • Adriana Kocornik-Mina
  • Hayley Leck
  • Swenja Surminski

Abstract

Adapting to climate change requires the engagement of all actors in society. Until recently, predominant research focus has been on governments, communities and the third sector as key actors in the adaptation process. Yet, there is a growing emphasis internationally on understanding the role of and the need to engage businesses in adaptation given their potential to finance projects, develop and deploy technologies and innovative solutions, and enhance the scale and cost-effectiveness of certain adaptation measures. Already, many multinational corporations (MNCs) are purportedly beginning to take steps to adapt their operations to climate change. Some stated reasons for their engagement include minimising potential impacts on their supply chains, improving resource efficiency, enhancing the production and use of sustainable raw materials, and supporting customers’, suppliers’ and communities’ efforts to adapt to climate change. However, there is a paucity of work analysing adaptation actions by MNCs, their motivations and contribution to broader adaptation and climate resilient development efforts, as well as possible instances of maladaptation. We apply a three-tier framework on drivers, responses and outcomes to examine the state of knowledge according to recent literature on private sector and MNC adaptation to climate change. Our review highlights that the literature on the impact and outcomes of MNC adaptation actions is considerably sparse and we consider the implications for future research. Our analysis concludes with a reflection on the relevance of MNC-led adaptation – for the companies themselves, for policy-makers at all scales, as well as for society at large.

Suggested Citation

  • Alina Averchenkova & Florence Crick & Adriana Kocornik-Mina & Hayley Leck & Swenja Surminski, 2015. "Multinational corporations and climate adaptation – Are we asking the right questions? A review of current knowledge and a new research perspective," GRI Working Papers 183, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  • Handle: RePEc:lsg:lsgwps:wp183
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Working-Paper-183-Averchenkova-et-al.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jonatan Pinkse & Ans Kolk, 2012. "Multinational enterprises and climate change: Exploring institutional failures and embeddedness," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 43(3), pages 332-341, April.
    2. Daniel Scott & Geoff McBoyle, 2007. "Climate change adaptation in the ski industry," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 12(8), pages 1411-1431, October.
    3. Shardul Agrawala & Maëlis Carraro & Nicholas Kingsmill & Elisa Lanzi & Michael Mullan & Guillaume Prudent-Richard, 2011. "Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change: Approaches to Managing Climate Risks," OECD Environment Working Papers 39, OECD Publishing.
    4. Jonatan Pinkse & Ans Kolk, 2012. "Addressing the climate change sustainable development nexus: the role of multi-stakeholder partnerships," Grenoble Ecole de Management (Post-Print) hal-00707337, HAL.
    5. Zhang, Kevin Honglin, 2014. "How does foreign direct investment affect industrial competitiveness? Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 530-539.
    6. Ans Kolk & Jonatan Pinkse, 2008. "A perspective on multinational enterprises and climate change: Learning from “an inconvenient truth”?," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 39(8), pages 1359-1378, December.
    7. Barry Smit & Ian Burton & Richard Klein & J. Wandel, 2000. "An Anatomy of Adaptation to Climate Change and Variability," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 223-251, April.
    8. Ian Lienert, 2009. "Where Does the Public Sector End and the Private Sector Begin?," IMF Working Papers 09/122, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Evan Mills, 2009. "A Global Review of Insurance Industry Responses to Climate Change," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 34(3), pages 323-359, July.
    10. Jeremy Galbreath, 2011. "To What Extent is Business Responding to Climate Change? Evidence from a Global Wine Producer," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 104(3), pages 421-432, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lsg:lsgwps:wp183. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (The GRI Administration). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/grlseuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.