IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/chieco/v30y2014icp530-539.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

How does foreign direct investment affect industrial competitiveness? Evidence from China

Author

Listed:
  • Zhang, Kevin Honglin

Abstract

Industrial competitiveness (IC) is a country's ability to produce and export manufactured goods competitively. How does foreign direct investment (FDI) affect IC in China? The significance of the topic, besides the intrinsic importance of IC, is heightened by outstanding performance of the Chinese industry and massive increase in FDI flows into China in the past decade. Yet empirical studies on the issue in the literature have been limited. This article attempts to close the gap by estimating the role of FDI with a large panel data of 21 manufacturing sectors for 31 regions in six years (2005–2010). We construct, following the method of UNIDO (2002), the IC index to measure multidimensional industrial performance. Several empirical specifications are developed for IC level and IC growth with both panel and cross-section data. Results suggest that FDI has large positive effects on China's industrial performance; such effects are much greater on low-tech manufacturing than medium- and high-tech industries, and the contribution is enhanced by FDI's interaction with local human capital. The role of FDI increases with FDI inflows over the period, and changes in FDI affect changes in industrial performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhang, Kevin Honglin, 2014. "How does foreign direct investment affect industrial competitiveness? Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 530-539.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:30:y:2014:i:c:p:530-539
    DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2013.08.003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1043951X13000722
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zhongxiu Zhao & Kevin Honglin Zhang, 2010. "FDI and Industrial Productivity in China: Evidence from Panel Data in 2001-06," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(s1), pages 656-665, August.
    2. Bruno Van Pottelsberghe De La Potterie & Frank Lichtenberg, 2001. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Transfer Technology Across Borders?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 490-497, August.
    3. Markusen, James R. & Venables, Anthony J., 1999. "Foreign direct investment as a catalyst for industrial development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 335-356, February.
    4. Crespo, Nuno & Fontoura, Maria Paula, 2007. "Determinant Factors of FDI Spillovers - What Do We Really Know?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 410-425, March.
    5. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    6. Ouyang, Puman & Fu, Shihe, 2012. "Economic growth, local industrial development and inter-regional spillovers from foreign direct investment: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 445-460.
    7. Borensztein, E. & De Gregorio, J. & Lee, J-W., 1998. "How does foreign direct investment affect economic growth?1," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 115-135, June.
    8. John Weiss & Hossein Jalilian, 2004. "Industrialization in an age of globalization: some comparisons between East and South East Asia and Latin America," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 283-307.
    9. Blomstrom, Magnus & Sjoholm, Fredrik, 1999. "Technology transfer and spillovers: Does local participation with multinationals matter?1," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 915-923, April.
    10. Beata Smarzynska Javorcik, 2004. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Increase the Productivity of Domestic Firms? In Search of Spillovers Through Backward Linkages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 605-627, June.
    11. Rodriguez-Clare, Andres, 1996. "Multinationals, Linkages, and Economic Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 852-873, September.
    12. Sourafel Girma, 2005. "Absorptive Capacity and Productivity Spillovers from FDI: A Threshold Regression Analysis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(3), pages 281-306, June.
    13. Amann, Edmund, 2002. "Globalisation, industrial efficiency and technological sovereignty: Evidence from Brazil," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 875-888.
    14. Ram, Rati & Zhang, Kevin Honglin, 2002. "Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth: Evidence from Cross-Country Data for the 1990s," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(1), pages 205-215, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zhou, Jing & Latorre, María C., 2015. "FDI in China and global production networks: Assessing the role of and impact on big world players (East Asia, Japan, EU28 and U.S.)," MPRA Paper 62297, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Latorre, María C. & Hosoe, Nobuhiro, 2016. "The role of Japanese FDI in China," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 226-241.
    3. Alina Averchenkova & Florence Crick & Adriana Kocornik-Mina & Hayley Leck & Swenja Surminski, 2015. "Multinational corporations and climate adaptation – Are we asking the right questions? A review of current knowledge and a new research perspective," GRI Working Papers 183, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    4. Takanori Minamikawa, 2018. "Evaluation of the sophistication of Chinese industries using the information-geometric decomposition approach," Discussion papers 1801 Classification- C02,, ERINA - Economic Research Institute for Northeast Asia, revised Apr 2018.
    5. Zhang, Lin, 2017. "The knowledge spillover effects of FDI on the productivity and efficiency of research activities in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 1-14.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial competitiveness (IC); Multinational corporations (MNCs); Foreign direct investment (FDI);

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:30:y:2014:i:c:p:530-539. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.