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Labour mobility during transition: evidence from Georgia

Author

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  • Sabine Bernab?
  • Marco Stampini

Abstract

This paper deals with labour mobility in Georgia during economic transition. We use quarterly 1998-99 panel data to examine mobility across six labour market statuses (inactivity, unemployment, formal wage employment, informal wage employment, selfemployment and farming). Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis of labour market segmentation. Formal employment is preferred to informal employment. Unemployment is largely a queuing device for individuals with higher education waiting for formal jobs. Some self-employment is subsistence activities and consistent with a segmented labour market, while other is high risk and potentially high return activities. Age, gender and education are significant determinants of labour mobility. Finally, informal employment serves as a buffer in times of recession -with farming and informal wage employment absorbing labour shed by other statuses during the Russian financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Sabine Bernab? & Marco Stampini, 2008. "Labour mobility during transition: evidence from Georgia," LICOS Discussion Papers 20608, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
  • Handle: RePEc:lic:licosd:20608
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    File URL: http://www.econ.kuleuven.be/licos/publications/dp/dp206.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gong, Xiaodong & Van Soest, Arthur & Villagomez, Elizabeth, 2004. "Mobility in the Urban Labor Market: A Panel Data Analysis for Mexico," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 1-36, October.
    2. Sorm, Vit & Terrell, Katherine, 2000. "Sectoral Restructuring and Labor Mobility: A Comparative Look at the Czech Republic," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 431-455, September.
    3. World Bank, 2002. "Georgia : Poverty Update," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15447, The World Bank.
    4. Peter F. Orazem & Milan Vodopivec & Ruth Wu, 2005. "Worker displacement during the transition: Experience from Slovenia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 13(2), pages 311-340, April.
    5. Fields,Gary S., 2005. "A guide to multisector labor market models," Policy Research Working Paper Series 32547, The World Bank.
    6. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 2000. "Tenures That Shook the World: Worker Turnover in Russia, Poland, and Britain," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 639-664, December.
    7. Lehmann, Hartmut & Pignatti, Norberto & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 2006. "The incidence and cost of job loss in the Ukrainian labor market," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 248-271, June.
    8. Fields, Gary S., 1975. "Rural-urban migration, urban unemployment and underemployment, and job-search activity in LDCs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 165-187, June.
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    10. William T. Dickens & Kevin Lang, 1992. "Labor Market Segmentation Theory: Reconsidering the Evidence," NBER Working Papers 4087, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pagés, Carmen & Stampini, Marco, 2009. "No education, no good jobs? Evidence on the relationship between education and labor market segmentation," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 387-401, September.
    2. H. Lehmann & T. Razzolini & A. Zaiceva, 2011. "Job Separations, Job Loss and Informality in the Russian Labor Market," Working Papers wp800, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    3. Lehmann, Hartmut & Razzolini, Tiziano & Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2011. "Job Separations and Informality in the Russian Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 6230, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Mónica Jiménez, 2013. "La informalidad laboral en el sector formal. Un análisis preliminar," Working Papers 10, Instituto de Estudios Laborales y del Desarrollo Económico (IELDE) - Universidad Nacional de Salta - Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Jurídicas y Sociales.
    5. Aysit Tansel & Elif Öznur Acar, 2017. "Labor mobility across the formal/informal divide in Turkey: Evidence from individual-level data," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 44(4), pages 617-635, September.
    6. H Ingham & M Ingham, 2010. "Temporary Work in Poland: Who Gets the Jobs?," Working Papers 604645, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    7. Nguyen, Duy Loi & Nguyen, Binh Giang & Tran, Thi Ha & Vo, Thi Minh Le & Nguyen, Dinh Ngan, 2014. "Employment, Earnings and Social Protection for Female Workers in Vietnam’s Informal Sector," MPRA Paper 61989, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. H. Lehmann & A. Zaiceva, 2013. "Informal Employment in Russia: Incidence, Determinants and Labor Market Segmentation," Working Papers wp903, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    9. Fabián Slonimczyk & Vladimir Gimpelson, 2015. "Informality and mobility," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(2), pages 299-341, April.
    10. Stampini Marco & Verdier-Chouchane Audrey, 2011. "Labor Market Dynamics in Tunisia: The Issue of Youth Unemployment," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-35, September.
    11. Herzfeld, Thomas & Dries, Liesbeth & Glauben, Thomas, 2011. "Labour adjustment in agriculture: Assessing the heterogeneity across transition countries," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114540, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. Lehmann, Hartmut & Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2013. "Re-defining Informal Employment and Measuring its Determinants: Evidence from Russia," IZA Discussion Papers 7844, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Ron Leung & Marco Stampini & Désiré Vencatachellum, 2010. "Working Paper 106 - Does Human Capital Protect Workers against Exogenous Shocks? South Africa in the 2008 - 2009 Crisis," Working Paper Series 243, African Development Bank.
    14. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00449447 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. María del Pilar Casal & Bradford L. Barham, 2013. "Women’s Mobility in the Argentine Labour Market," Económica, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, vol. 59, pages 88-125, January-D.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour mobility; informal labour; transition; Georgia;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population

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