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Labour mobility during transition Evidence from Georgia1

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  • Sabine Bernabè
  • Marco Stampini

Abstract

This article deals with labour mobility in Georgia during economic transition. We use quarterly 1998–99 panel data to examine mobility across six labour market statuses (inactivity, unemployment, formal wage employment, informal wage employment, self‐employment and farming). Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis of labour market segmentation. Formal employment is preferred to informal employment. Unemployment is largely a queuing device for individuals with higher education waiting for formal jobs. Some self‐employment is subsistence activities and consistent with a segmented labour market, while other is high risk and potentially high return activities. Age, gender and education are significant determinants of labour mobility. Finally, informal employment serves as a buffer in times of recession – with farming and informal wage employment absorbing labour shed by other statuses during the Russian financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Sabine Bernabè & Marco Stampini, 2009. "Labour mobility during transition Evidence from Georgia1," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(2), pages 377-409, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:17:y:2009:i:2:p:377-409
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0351.2009.00345.x
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    Cited by:

    1. H. Lehmann & T. Razzolini & A. Zaiceva, 2011. "Job Separations, Job Loss and Informality in the Russian Labor Market," Working Papers wp800, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    2. Lehmann, Hartmut & Razzolini, Tiziano & Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2011. "Job Separations and Informality in the Russian Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 6230, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. François Gardes & Christophe Starzec, 2009. "Polish Households' Behavior in the Regular and Informal Economies," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 60(5), pages 1181-1210.
    4. Rami Al Sidawi & Teo Urushadze & Angelika Ploeger, 2020. "Changes in Dairy Products Value Chain in Georgia," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(15), pages 1-29, July.
    5. Lehmann, Hartmut & Pignatti, Norberto, 2018. "Informal employment relationships and the labor market: Is there segmentation in Ukraine?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 838-857.
    6. Aysit Tansel & Elif Öznur Acar, 2017. "Labor mobility across the formal/informal divide in Turkey: Evidence from individual-level data," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 44(4), pages 617-635, September.
    7. Fabián Slonimczyk & Vladimir Gimpelson, 2015. "Informality and mobility," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(2), pages 299-341, April.
    8. Susan Namirembe Kavuma & Oliver Morrissey & Richard Upward, 2015. "Worker Flows and the Impact of Labour Transitions on Earnings in Uganda," Discussion Papers 2015-01, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    9. Herzfeld, Thomas & Dries, Liesbeth & Glauben, Thomas, 2011. "Labour adjustment in agriculture: Assessing the heterogeneity across transition countries," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114540, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Tansel, Aysit & Ozdemir, Zeynel / A., 2014. "Determinants of Transitions across Formal/Informal sectors in Egypt," MPRA Paper 61183, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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