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Developing a Macro-Micro Model for Analyzing Gender Impacts of Public Policy

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  • Jerome De Henau
  • Susan Himmelweit

Abstract

This paper discusses new methods of combined macro-micro analysis of labor demand and supply to investigate the gender impacts of public policy. In particular it examines how studies have used input-output analysis together with more or less sophisticated methods of allocating people to jobs to model the impact of public investment in care on the gender employment gap and other inequality measures. It presents some results of a cross-country comparison of investment in the care and construction industries, suggesting methodological refinements to take account of the labor supply effects of such investment policies in order to enable a more detailed analysis of who gets the jobs generated and under what conditions of employment to achieve a more accurate assessment of a policy's full impact on employment inequalities. We argue that such a microsimulation of who is likely to get any newly created jobs should be able to take account of the (child)care "tax" paid by those with caring responsibilities on time spent in employment (as well as the formal tax and benefit system).

Suggested Citation

  • Jerome De Henau & Susan Himmelweit, 2020. "Developing a Macro-Micro Model for Analyzing Gender Impacts of Public Policy," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_966, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_966
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Boeri, Tito & Del Boca, Daniela & Pissarides, Christopher (ed.), 2005. "Women at Work: An Economic Perspective," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199281886.
    5. Thomas Masterson, 2013. "Quality of Statistical Match and Simulations Used in the Estimation of the Levy Institute Measure of Time and Consumption Poverty (LIMTCP) for Turkey in 2006," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_769, Levy Economics Institute.
    6. Tom Kornstad & Thor Thoresen, 2007. "A discrete choice model for labor supply and childcare," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 781-803, October.
    7. Seguino, Stephanie, 2000. "Gender Inequality and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1211-1230, July.
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    10. Susan Himmelweit, 2002. "Making Visible the Hidden Economy: The Case for Gender-Impact Analysis of Economic Policy," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 49-70.
    11. Jérôme De Henau & Danièle Meulders & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai, 2010. "Maybe baby: comparing mothers' employment and child policies in the EU-15," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/13478, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Care; Microsimulation; Public Investment; Labor Demand; Gender;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods

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