IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/lev/wrkpap/wp_619.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Asia and the Global Crisis: Recovery Prospects and the Future

Author

Listed:
  • Jesus Felipe

Abstract

The global crisis of 2007–09 affected developing Asia largely through a decline in exports to the developed countries and a slowdown in remittances. This happened very quickly, and by 2009 there were already signs of recovery (except on the employment front). This recovery was led by China’s impressive performance, aided by a large stimulus package and easy credit. But China needs to make efforts toward rebalancing its economy. Although private consumption has increased at a fast pace during the last decades, investment has done so at an even faster pace, with the consequence that the share of consumption in total output is very low. The risk is that the country may fall into an underconsumption crisis. Looking at the medium and long term, developing Asia’s future is mixed. There is one group of countries with a highly diversified export basket. These countries have an excellent opportunity to thrive if the right policies are implemented. However, there is another group of countries that relies heavily on natural resources. These countries face a serious challenge, since they must diversify.

Suggested Citation

  • Jesus Felipe, 2010. "Asia and the Global Crisis: Recovery Prospects and the Future," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_619, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_619
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_619.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "The Aftermath of Financial Crises," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 466-472, May.
    2. Jesus Felipe & Utsav Kumar & Norio Usui & Arnelyn Abdon, 2013. "Why has China succeeded? And why it will continue to do so," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(4), pages 791-818.
    3. Park, Donghyun & Shin, Kwanho, 2010. "Can Trade with the People’s Republic of China Be an Engine of Growth for Developing Asia ," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 27(1), pages 160-181.
    4. Ricardo Hausmann & Francisco Rodríguez & Rodrigo Wagner, 2006. "Growth Collapses," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2006-024, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
    5. Gupta, Souvik & Miniane, Jacques, 2009. "Recessions and Recoveries in Asia: What Can the Past Teach Us about the Present Recession?," ADBI Working Papers 150, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asia; China; Global Crisis; Open Forest;

    JEL classification:

    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_619. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Elizabeth Dunn). General contact details of provider: http://www.levyinstitute.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.