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Growth After the Crisis

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  • Rodrik, Dani

Abstract

How hospitable will the global environment be for economic growth in the developing world as we come out of the present financial crisis? The answer depends on how well we manage the following tension. On the one hand, global macro stability requires that we prevent external imbalances from getting too large. On the other hand, growth in poor nations requires that the world economy be able to absorb a rapid increase in the supply of tradables produced in the developing world. It is possible to render these two requirements compatible, but doing so requires greater use of explicit industrial policies in developing countries, which have the potential of encouraging modern tradable activities without spilling over into trade surpluses. The “price” to be paid for greater discipline on real exchange rates and external imbalances is greater use (and permissiveness towards) industrial polices.

Suggested Citation

  • Rodrik, Dani, 2009. "Growth After the Crisis," CEPR Discussion Papers 7480, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7480
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chang-Tai Hsieh & Peter J. Klenow, 2009. "Misallocation and Manufacturing TFP in China and India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1403-1448.
    2. Ricardo Hausmann, 2008. "In Search of the Chains that Hold Brazil Back," CID Working Papers 180, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lavopa, Alejandro & Szirmai, Adam, 2012. "Industrialization, employment and poverty," MERIT Working Papers 081, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Seghezza, Elena & Morelli, Pierluigi & Pittaluga, Giovanni B., 2017. "Reserve accumulation and exchange rate policy in China: The authoritarian elite's aim of political survival," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 163-174.
    3. Amat Adarov & Mario Holzner & Luka Sikic, 2016. "Backwardness, Industrialisation and Economic Development in Europe," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 123, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    4. Razmi, Arslan & Rapetti, Martin & Skott, Peter, 2012. "The real exchange rate and economic development," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 151-169.
    5. Theodore H. Moran, 2014. "Foreign Investment and Supply Chains in Emerging Markets: Recurring Problems and Demonstrated Solutions," Working Paper Series WP14-12, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    6. Gabriel, Luciano Ferreira & Jayme, Frederico G. & Oreiro, José Luis, 2016. "A North-South Model of Economic Growth, Technological Gap, Structural Change and Real Exchange Rate," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 83-94.
    7. Szirmai, Adam, 2011. "Manufacturing and Economic Development," WIDER Working Paper Series 075, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Deraniyagala, Sonali & Kaluwa, Ben, 2011. "Macroeconomic policy for employment creation: The case of Malawi," MPRA Paper 52715, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Marko Malovic, 2009. "International Financial Crisis, G-20 And Global Policy Response," Montenegrin Journal of Economics, Economic Laboratory for Transition Research (ELIT), vol. 5(10), pages 119-127.
    10. Theodore H Moran, 2016. "The Role of Industrial Policy as a Development Tool: New Evidence from the Globalization of Trade-and-Investment," Working Papers id:8423, eSocialSciences.
    11. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Marion Kohler & Christian Upper, 2009. "Financial crises and economic activity," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 89-135.
    12. Mulatu, Abay, 2016. "On the concept of 'competitiveness' and its usefulness for policy," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 50-62.
    13. Szirmai, Adam & Verspagen, Bart, 2015. "Manufacturing and economic growth in developing countries, 1950–2005," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 46-59.
    14. Jimenez, Gonzalo Hernandez & Razmi, Arslan, 2013. "Can Asia sustain an export-led growth strategy in the aftermath of the global crisis? Exploring a neglected aspect," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 45-61.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; Financial crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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