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Poverty and Permanent Income : A Methodology for Cross-Section Data

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  • Ramses H. ABUL NAGA
  • Enrico BOLZANI

Abstract

If the set of households which are income poor does not fully overlap with the set of the consumption poor, it could well be that income and consumption expenditure convey different information regarding an unobserved variable on the basis of which families allocate their resources intertemporally. This paper presents a methodology for predicting the unobserved permanent incomes of households using multiple welfare indicators typically available in cross-section data. The methods are illustrated using data from the Swiss Consumption Survey of 1990.

Suggested Citation

  • Ramses H. ABUL NAGA & Enrico BOLZANI, 2000. "Poverty and Permanent Income : A Methodology for Cross-Section Data," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'économie 00.26, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, Département d’économie.
  • Handle: RePEc:lau:crdeep:00.26
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    1. Zellner, Arnold, 1970. "Estimation of Regression Relationships Containing Unobservable Independent Variables," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 11(3), pages 441-454, October.
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    12. Buhmann, Brigitte, et al, 1988. "Equivalence Scales, Well-Being, Inequality, and Poverty: Sensitivity Estimates across Ten Countries Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Database," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 34(2), pages 115-142, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ramses H. Abul Naga, 2005. "Social Welfare Orderings: A Life‐Cycle Perspective," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 72(287), pages 497-514, August.
    2. Nasri, Khaled & Belhadj, Besma, 2017. "Multidimensional Poverty Measurement in Tunisia: Distribution of Deprivations across Regions," MPRA Paper 83318, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Berloffa, Gabriella & Modena, Francesca, 2013. "Income shocks, coping strategies, and consumption smoothing: An application to Indonesian data," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 158-171.
    4. Riccardo Massari, 2005. "A Measure of Welfare Based on Permanent Income Hypothesis: An Application on Italian Households Budgets," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 64(1), pages 55-92, September.
    5. Céline Antonin, 2009. "Age, revenu et comportements d'épargne des ménages : une analyse théorique et empirique sur la période 1978-2006," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5l6uh8ogmqi, Sciences Po.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    poverty; permanent income; latent variables; prediction; Switzerland;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C2 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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