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Job polarization and jobless recoveries in Japan: Evidence from 1984 to 2010

Author

Listed:
  • Yosuke Furukawa

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kyoto University)

  • Hiroki Toyoda

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kyoto University)

Abstract

This study presents evidence for the existence of job polarization in Japan, identifies its effects across four age cohorts, and shows its relationship to Japan's business cycles during 1984-2010. The findings indicate that middle-skilled occupations decreased most sharply among the youngest workers. Our examination of the relationship between occupational categories and the business cycles demonstrates that job polarization is cyclical rather than gradual. Particularly, only employment in middle-skilled occupations did not recover after recessions. This finding underlies Japan's jobless recovery.

Suggested Citation

  • Yosuke Furukawa & Hiroki Toyoda, 2013. "Job polarization and jobless recoveries in Japan: Evidence from 1984 to 2010," KIER Working Papers 874, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:874
    as

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    File URL: http://www.kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/DP/DP874.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fumio Hayashi & Edward C. Prescott, 2004. "The 1990s in Japan: a lost decade," Chapters,in: The Economics of an Ageing Population, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    3. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2007. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-133, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Jobless recoveries; job polarization; business cycles;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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