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The Delayed Effects of Monetary Shocks in a Two-sector New Keynesian Model

  • Munechika Katayama
  • Kwang Hwan Kim

This paper studies a two-sector New Keynesian model that captures the hump-shaped response of non-durable and durable spending to a monetary shock when non-durable prices are sticky and durable goods are flexibly priced. Based on the estimated parameters, we show that habit formation and investment adjustment costs are not sucient to generate the gradual response of non-durable and durable spending in this setup. We find that nominal wage rigidity and non-separable preferences between consumption and labor are also necessary to delay the peak response of non-durable and durable spending in the estimated two-sector New Keynesian model.

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File URL: http://www.econ.kyoto-u.ac.jp/projectcenter/Paper/e-13-003.pdf
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Paper provided by Graduate School of Economics Project Center, Kyoto University in its series Discussion papers with number e-13-003.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kue:dpaper:e-13-003
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  1. Robert Barsky & Christopher L. House & Miles Kimball, 2005. "Sticky Price Models and Durable Goods," Macroeconomics 0501031, EconWPA.
  2. Monika Piazzesi & Martin Schneider & Selale Tuzel, 2006. "Housing, Consumption, and Asset Pricing," NBER Working Papers 12036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Pablo A. Guerrón-Quintana & James M. Nason, 2013. "Bayesian estimation of DSGE models," Chapters, in: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Empirical Macroeconomics, chapter 21, pages 486-512 Edward Elgar.
  4. Matteo Iacoviello & Stefano Neri, 2007. "Housing Market Spillovers: Evidence from an Estimated DSGE Model," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 659, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 23 Oct 2009.
  5. Erceg, Christopher & Levin, Andrew, 2006. "Optimal monetary policy with durable consumption goods," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(7), pages 1341-1359, October.
  6. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 2000. "Habit Formation in Consumption and Its Implications for Monetary-Policy Models," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 367-390, June.
  7. Robert Shimer, 2009. "Convergence in Macroeconomics: The Labor Wedge," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 280-97, January.
  8. Monacelli, Tommaso, 2006. "New Keynesian Models, Durable Goods and Collateral Constraints," CEPR Discussion Papers 5916, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Kim, Jinill, 2000. "Constructing and estimating a realistic optimizing model of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 329-359, April.
  10. Eric M. Leeper & Christopher A. Sims & Tao Zha, 1996. "What Does Monetary Policy Do?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 1-78.
  11. Andrea Gerali & Stefano Neri & Luca Sessa & Federico M. Signoretti, 2010. "Credit and banking in a DSGE model of the euro area," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 740, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  12. Christopher J. Erceg & Dale W. Henderson & Andrew T. Levin, 1999. "Optimal monetary policy with staggered wage and price contracts," International Finance Discussion Papers 640, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  13. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
  14. Carlstrom, Charles T. & Fuerst, Timothy S., 2010. "Nominal Rigidities, Residential Investment, And Adjustment Costs," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(01), pages 136-148, February.
  15. Guerron-Quintana, Pablo A., 2008. "Refinements on macroeconomic modeling: The role of non-separability and heterogeneous labor supply," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 3613-3630, November.
  16. Kim, Kwang Hwan & Katayama, Munechika, 2013. "Non-separability and sectoral comovement in a sticky price model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1715-1735.
  17. Reinhart, Carmen & Ogaki, Masao, 1995. "Measuring intertemporal substitution: The role of durable goods," MPRA Paper 13690, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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