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The Delayed Effects of Monetary Shocks in a Two-sector New Keynesian Model

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  • Munechika Katayama
  • Kwang Hwan Kim

Abstract

This paper studies a two-sector New Keynesian model that captures the hump-shaped response of non-durable and durable spending to a monetary shock when non-durable prices are sticky and durable goods are flexibly priced. Based on the estimated parameters, we show that habit formation and investment adjustment costs are not sucient to generate the gradual response of non-durable and durable spending in this setup. We find that nominal wage rigidity and non-separable preferences between consumption and labor are also necessary to delay the peak response of non-durable and durable spending in the estimated two-sector New Keynesian model.

Suggested Citation

  • Munechika Katayama & Kwang Hwan Kim, 2013. "The Delayed Effects of Monetary Shocks in a Two-sector New Keynesian Model," Discussion papers e-13-003, Graduate School of Economics Project Center, Kyoto University.
  • Handle: RePEc:kue:dpaper:e-13-003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Di Pace, Federico & Hertweck, Matthias S., 2012. "Labour Market Frictions, Monetary Policy, and Durable Goods," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62052, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Cantelmo, Alessandro & Melina, Giovanni, 2018. "Monetary policy and the relative price of durable goods," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 1-48.
    3. Munechika Katayama & Kwang Hwan Kim, 2015. "Inter-sectoral Labor Immobility, Sectoral Co-movement, and News Shocks," Discussion papers e-15-011, Graduate School of Economics , Kyoto University.
    4. Tomiyuki Kitamura & Tamon Takamura, 2016. "Output Comovement and Inflation Dynamics in a Two-Sector Model with Durable Goods: The Role of Sticky Information and Heterogeneous Factor Markets," Staff Working Papers 16-36, Bank of Canada.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sticky Prices; Sticky Wages; Non-Separable Preferences; Two-sector New Keynesian Model;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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