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What Factors Promote Peatland Fire Prevention? Evidence from Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

Author

Listed:
  • Yuki Yamamoto

    (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

  • Kenji Takeuchi

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

  • Gunnar Kohlin

    (Department of Economics, the University of Gothenburg)

Abstract

This study investigates the factors that promote peatland fire prevention in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. We focus on Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership (KFCP) as one of the earliest pilot projects to reduce emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD). We estimate an agricultural labor allocation model by combining household survey data and satellite information. The results suggest that the impact of KFCP on household decision making concerning fire prevention at agricultural plots is statistically insignificant. This can be attributed to the fact that the KFCP has not changed the incentives for household fire prevention at individual plots. Economic factors such as the value of labor allocation for rubber production and exogenous income as well as non-economic factors such as traditional mutual assistance, called Goton-royong, are statistically significant. These results suggest that an appropriate design for intervention would be a combination of economic and non-economic incentives to achieve effective REDD policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Yuki Yamamoto & Kenji Takeuchi & Gunnar Kohlin, 2013. "What Factors Promote Peatland Fire Prevention? Evidence from Central Kalimantan, Indonesia," Discussion Papers 1312, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:koe:wpaper:1312
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    File URL: http://www.econ.kobe-u.ac.jp/RePEc/koe/wpaper/2013/1312.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yuki Yamamoto & Kenji Takeuchi, 2012. "Estimating the break-even price for forest protection in Central Kalimantan," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 14(3), pages 289-301, July.
    2. Barrett, Christopher B., 1999. "Stochastic food prices and slash-and-burn agriculture," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(02), pages 161-176, May.
    3. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Binswanger, Hans P, 1993. "Wealth, Weather Risk and the Composition and Profitability of Agricultural Investments," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(416), pages 56-78, January.
    4. Sujarwoto, Sujarwoto & Tampubolon, Gindo, 2013. "Mother's social capital and child health in Indonesia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 1-9.
    5. Erik Olbrei & Stephen Howes, 2012. "A Very Real and Practical Contribution? - Lessons from the Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership," Development Policy Centre Discussion Papers 1216, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    6. Bowman, Maria S. & Amacher, Gregory S. & Merry, Frank D., 2008. "Fire use and prevention by traditional households in the Brazilian Amazon," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 117-130, August.
    7. Monica Fisher & Gerald E. Shively & Steven Buccola, 2005. "Activity Choice, Labor Allocation, and Forest Use in Malawi," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(4).
    8. Shively, Gerald E., 2001. "Poverty, consumption risk, and soil conservation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 267-290, August.
    9. Jonathan Morduch, 1995. "Income Smoothing and Consumption Smoothing," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 103-114, Summer.
    10. Jolliffe, Dean, 2004. "The impact of education in rural Ghana: examining household labor allocation and returns on and off the farm," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 287-314, February.
    11. Gerald Shively & Monica Fisher, 2004. "Smallholder Labor and Deforestation: A Systems Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1361-1366.
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    Cited by:

    1. Meine van Noordwijk & Robin Matthews & Fahmuddin Agus & Jenny Farmer & Louis Verchot & Kristell Hergoualc’h & Sebastian Persch & Hesti Tata & Betha Lusiana & Atiek Widayati & Sonya Dewi, 2014. "Mud, muddle and models in the knowledge value-chain to action on tropical peatland conservation," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 887-905, August.

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