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A Very Real and Practical Contribution? - Lessons from the Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership

Author

Listed:
  • Erik Olbrei

    () (Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University)

  • Stephen Howes

    () (Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University)

Abstract

On 9 September 2007, Australian Ministers and the Indonesian President announced a $100 million Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership (KFCP). This would involve protecting 70,000 hectares of peat forests, re-flooding 200,000 hectares of dried peatland, and planting 100 million trees in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Since then, the ambitions of KFCP have been quietly but drastically scaled back. The area expected to be re-flooded by the project is now just over 10 per cent of the original target. And little progress has been made on the ground. Four years on, blocking of the large canals required for re-flooding has yet to commence, and only 50,000 trees have been planted against the initial target of 100 million. What has happened to what was labelled at its launch as 'a very real and very practical contribution', one which would yield 'immediate and tangible results'? We analyze KFCP both as an aid 'announceable' and as a REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) demonstration project, and reach two main conclusions. First, KFCP illustrates the damage that an emphasis on announcing new projects and a lack of attention to reporting on project progress can cause aid. Not enough has been done to publicly reposition KFCP as a much smaller, demonstration project. Second, slow progress made in implementing KFCP (and other REDD projects), when juxtaposed against the continued rapid rate of land conversion in Indonesia, suggests that the current approach is not working. There is no easy solution. Reducing deforestation in Indonesia is a difficult task because the drivers of deforestation – which range from weak governance to a strong industry lobby and the attractive economics of palm oil – are strong and difficult to tackle. If it is worth continuing, then the focus on pilots and processes which has characterized Australia’s engagement in Indonesia’s forestry sector in recent years should be re-oriented towards a more ambitious engagement. This should be supported by a vigorous high-level policy dialogue and at least the realistic prospect of a large amount of public funds.

Suggested Citation

  • Erik Olbrei & Stephen Howes, 2012. "A Very Real and Practical Contribution? - Lessons from the Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership," Development Policy Centre Discussion Papers 1216, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:devpol:1216
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    File URL: http://devpolicy.anu.edu.au/pdf/papers/DP_16_-_A_very_real_and_practical_contribution.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Westholm, Lisa & Henders, Sabine & Ostwald, Madelene & Mattsson, Eskil, 2009. "Assessment of existing global financial initiatives and monitoring aspects of carbon sinks in forest ecosystems – The issue of REDD," Working Papers in Economics 373, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yuki Yamamoto & Kenji Takeuchi & Gunnar Kohlin, 2013. "What Factors Promote Peatland Fire Prevention? Evidence from Central Kalimantan, Indonesia," Discussion Papers 1312, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    2. repec:spr:ieaple:v:17:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10784-016-9335-8 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    deforestation; Indonesia; Australian aid; climate change; REDD;

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • N55 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Asia including Middle East
    • Q23 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Forestry

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