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Employer provided training in Austria: Productivity, wages and wage inequality

Author

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  • René Böheim
  • Nicole Schneeweis
  • Florian Wakolbinger

Abstract

We use data on Austrian firms and employees to estimate the effects of employer-provided training on productivity, wages, and the inequality of wages within firms. While the average amount spent on employer-provided training is low in general, we find a robust positive elasticity of training on productivity of about 0.04. In-house training is more effective than external courses, and language, administrative and personal skills courses are more effective than sales training and IT-courses. We find a significant relationship between training and wages, the coefficient is about 0.05. We find no significant effect of training on the inequality of wages within firms.

Suggested Citation

  • René Böheim & Nicole Schneeweis & Florian Wakolbinger, 2009. "Employer provided training in Austria: Productivity, wages and wage inequality," NRN working papers 2009-27, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  • Handle: RePEc:jku:nrnwps:2009_27
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Serguei Kaniovski & Michael Peneder, 2008. "Determinants of firm survival: a duration analysis using the generalized gamma distribution," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 41-58, March.
    2. Benoit Dostie, 2011. "Wages, Productivity and Aging," De Economist, Springer, vol. 159(2), pages 139-158, June.
    3. Ann P. Bartel, 1992. "Training, Wage Growth and Job Performance: Evidence From a Company Database," NBER Working Papers 4027, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Bartel, Ann P, 1995. "Training, Wage Growth, and Job Performance: Evidence from a Company Database," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(3), pages 401-425, July.
    5. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2006. "The Impact of Training on Productivity and Wages: Evidence from British Panel Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(4), pages 397-421, August.
    6. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2001. "How To Compete: The Impact Of Workplace Practices And Information Technology On Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 434-445, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Preeya Mohan & Eric Strobl & Patrick Watson, 2017. "In-Firm Training, Innovation and Productivity: The Case of Caribbean Small Island Developing States," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8216, Inter-American Development Bank.
    2. Preeya Mohan & Eric Strobl & Patrick Watson, 2017. "In-Firm Training, Innovation and Productivity: The Case of Caribbean Small Island Developing States," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 98136, Inter-American Development Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    employer-provided training; productivity; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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