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Depression of the deprived or eroding enthusiasm of the elites: What has shifted the support for globalization?

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Listed:
  • Philipp Harms

    () (Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz)

  • Jakob Schwab

    () (German Development Institute)

Abstract

We use the 2003 and 2013 waves of the International Survey Program (ISSP) in order to explore the change in people’s attitudes that may be behind the recent backlash against globalization. We show that the average support for international trade has decreased in many – albeit not all – countries, and we demonstrate that these changes are related to the depth and length of the global financial crisis of 2008/09 as well as the evolution of income inequality. Moreover, our results document a declining support for international trade of those individuals who are likely to benefit from globalization: the young, high-skilled and well-off. We show that this “eroding enthusiasm of the elites” is empirically relevant even if we control for individuals’ increasing exposure to international labor-market competition.

Suggested Citation

  • Philipp Harms & Jakob Schwab, 2019. "Depression of the deprived or eroding enthusiasm of the elites: What has shifted the support for globalization?," Working Papers 1912, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
  • Handle: RePEc:jgu:wpaper:1912
    as

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    File URL: https://download.uni-mainz.de/RePEc/pdf/Discussion_Paper_1912.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Globalization; Protectionism; Attitudes; Survey Studies;

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