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Financial permeation as a role of microfinance : has microfinance actually been helpful to the poor?

Author

Listed:
  • Inoue, Takeshi
  • Hamori, Shigeyuki

Abstract

This article is distinct in its application of the logit transformation to the poverty ratio for the purpose of empirically examining whether the financial sector helps improve standards of living for low-income people. We propose the term financial permeation to describe how financial networks expand to spread money among the poor. We measure financial permeation by three indicators related to microfinance institutions (MFIs) and then examine its effect on poverty reduction at the macro level using panel data for 90 developing countries from 1995 to 2008. We find that financial permeation has a statistically significant and robust effect on decreasing the poverty ratio.

Suggested Citation

  • Inoue, Takeshi & Hamori, Shigeyuki, 2011. "Financial permeation as a role of microfinance : has microfinance actually been helpful to the poor?," IDE Discussion Papers 299, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper299
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Anthony Kyereboah-Coleman & Kofi A. Osei, 2008. "Outreach and profitability of microfinance institutions: the role of governance," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(3), pages 236-248, August.
    4. Ahlin, Christian & Lin, Jocelyn & Maio, Michael, 2011. "Where does microfinance flourish? Microfinance institution performance in macroeconomic context," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 105-120, July.
    5. Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2010. "Financial deepening and poverty reduction in Zambia: an empirical investigation," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(1), pages 41-53, February.
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    9. Katsushi S. Imai & Raghav Gaiha & Ganesh Thapa & Samuel Kobina Annim, 2010. "Analysis of Poverty Reducing Effects of Microfinance from a Macro Perspective: Evidence from Cross-Country Data," Discussion Paper Series DP2010-25, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
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    11. Takeshi Inoue & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2012. "How has financial deepening affected poverty reduction in India? Empirical analysis using state-level panel data," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(5), pages 395-408, March.
    12. Luintel, Kul B. & Khan, Mosahid, 1999. "A quantitative reassessment of the finance-growth nexus: evidence from a multivariate VAR," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 381-405, December.
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    16. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2009. "Finance-growth-poverty nexus in South Africa: A dynamic causality linkage," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 320-325, March.
    17. Mersland, Roy & Øystein Strøm, R., 2009. "Performance and governance in microfinance institutions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 662-669, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Inoue, Takeshi & Hamori, Shigeyuki, 2013. "Financial Permeation and Economic Growth: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 53417, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Developing countries; Microfinance; Poverty; Poverty reduction; Financial permeation; Microfinance; Panel Data;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O50 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - General

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