IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izapps/pp81.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Globalisation and the Future of the Welfare State

Author

Listed:
  • Chen, Yu-Fu

    () (University of Dundee)

  • Görg, Holger

    () (Kiel Institute for the World Economy)

  • Görlich, Dennis

    () (Kiel Institute for the World Economy)

  • Molana, Hassan

    () (University of Dundee)

  • Montagna, Catia

    () (University of Aberdeen)

  • Temouri, Yama

    () (Aston University)

Abstract

This paper reconsiders the link between welfare state provision, globalisation and competitiveness empirically. We challenge the conventional wisdom that welfare states, large-scale public provision of social insurance and progressive systems of redistributive taxation are incompatible with economic globalisation. Our empirical analysis is motivated by recent theoretical work that looks at the effects of redistribution policies in open economies models that capture the interconnectedness of welfare states, production structures and international economic integration when goods and factor markets are imperfectly competitive and countries possess specific characteristics – e.g. demographic structure, institutional features of labour markets, and government’s preference structure. Hence, contrary to the conventional view, the efficiency gains stemming from increasing international openness strengthen the positive feed-back effects between redistribution policies and the exploitation of aggregate scale economies. We find some evidence in line with the theory, suggesting that there is indeed a positive interaction between vertical linkages and social expenditure in raising competitiveness. We also look at an important aspect of globalisation, namely the activities of multinational companies, and investigate whether social expenditure, which arguably contributes to a stable and more attractive social and economic environment for the operations of businesses, hinders or attracts inward investors. We find that social expenditure may be attractive to inward FDI and may also act to anchor firms in the home country.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Yu-Fu & Görg, Holger & Görlich, Dennis & Molana, Hassan & Montagna, Catia & Temouri, Yama, 2014. "Globalisation and the Future of the Welfare State," IZA Policy Papers 81, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izapps:pp81
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/pp81.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Casarico Alessandra, 2001. "Pension systems in integrated capital markets," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-19, November.
    2. Molana, Hassan & Montagna, Catia, 2006. "Aggregate scale economies, market integration, and optimal welfare state policy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 321-340, July.
    3. DEL GATTO, Massimo & MION, Giordano & OTTAVIANO, Gianmarco I.P., 2006. "Trade integration, firm selection and the costs of non-Europe," CORE Discussion Papers 2006061, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    4. Andersen, Torben M., 2002. "International Integration, Risk and the Welfare State," IZA Discussion Papers 456, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Torben Andersen & Allan Sørensen, 2011. "Globalisation squeezes the public sector—is it so obvious?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 18(4), pages 369-382, August.
    6. Alesina, Alberto & Perotti, Roberto, 1997. "The Welfare State and Competitiveness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(5), pages 921-939, December.
    7. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 997-1032, October.
    8. de Mooij, Ruud A & Ederveen, Sjef, 2003. "Taxation and Foreign Direct Investment: A Synthesis of Empirical Research," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 10(6), pages 673-693, November.
    9. Ingo Geishecker & Holger Görg & Jakob Roland Munch, "undated". "Do Labour Market Institutions Matter? Micro-level Wage Effects of International Outsourcing in Three European Countries," Discussion Papers 07/42, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    10. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1997. "The selection principle and market failure in systems competition," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 247-274, November.
    11. Daniel Kopasker & Holger Görg & Hassan Molana & Catia Montagna, 2013. "Negative Shocks, Job Creation, and Selection," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 11, WWWforEurope.
    12. Bruce Blonigen, 2005. "A Review of the Empirical Literature on FDI Determinants," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 33(4), pages 383-403, December.
    13. Pennings, Enrico & Sleuwaegen, Leo, 2000. "International relocation: firm and industry determinants," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 179-186, May.
    14. Pemberton, James, 1999. "Social Security: National Policies with International Implications," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 492-508, July.
    15. Amable, Bruno, 2003. "The Diversity of Modern Capitalism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199261147.
    16. Görg, Holger & Molana, Hassan & Montagna, Catia, 2009. "Foreign direct investment, tax competition and social expenditure," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 31-37, January.
    17. Baldwin, Richard E. & Krugman, Paul, 2004. "Agglomeration, integration and tax harmonisation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 1-23, February.
    18. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57.
    19. Perotti, Roberto & Alesina, Alberto, 1997. "The Welfare State and Competitiveness," Scholarly Articles 4553027, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    20. Bartelsman, Eric J & Caballero, Ricardo J & Lyons, Richard K, 1994. "Customer- and Supplier-Driven Externalities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 1075-1084, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:feu:wfedel:y:2016:m:2:d:0:i:11 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:spr:qualqt:v:52:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11135-017-0501-z is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Karl Aiginger, 2016. "New Dynamics for Europe: Reaping the Benefits of Socio-ecological Transition. Synthesis Report Part I," WWWforEurope Deliverables series 11, WWWforEurope.
    4. Friedl, Andreas & Görlich, Dennis & Horn, Sebastian & Krieger-Boden, Christiane & Lücke, Matthias, 2015. "How to deal with inequality: Welfare system challenges and European responses," Kiel Policy Brief 85, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    welfare state; globalisation; economies of scale;

    JEL classification:

    • F6 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izapps:pp81. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak). General contact details of provider: http://www.iza.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.