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The Wage Return to Education: What Hides Behind the Least Squares Bias?

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  • Andini, Corrado

    () (University of Madeira)

Abstract

This paper combines the approach by Guimarães and Portugal (2010) with the methodology of Gelbach (2015) to investigate the determinants of the least squares bias of the wage return to education. We find that disregarding individual fixed effects is highly problematic, accounting for 95% of the bias. In contrast, disregarding firm fixed effects has marginal consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • Andini, Corrado, 2015. "The Wage Return to Education: What Hides Behind the Least Squares Bias?," IZA Discussion Papers 8855, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8855
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Guimaraes, Paulo & Portugal, Pedro, 2009. "A Simple Feasible Alternative Procedure to Estimate Models with High-Dimensional Fixed Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 3935, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1.
    4. Griliches, Zvi, 1977. "Estimating the Returns to Schooling: Some Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(1), pages 1-22, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    wages; education; least squares;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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